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PLEASE NOTE that adding courses or sessions to your calendar or personal sched.org schedule DOES NOT constitute conference registration or course selection.


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Thursday, February 13
 

9:00am PST

Opening Plenary Session -- David Perkins: Learning the Whole Game

As teachers, we all have ways of making learning meaningful by exciting students' interest and imagination. One approach to that challenge keeps in the foreground the big picture of what's being learned, the "whole game." Drawing on his book Making Learning Whole, David Perkins explores how teachers involve and inspire students through revealing the soul of a subject alongside its particulars.

 


Speakers
avatar for David N. Perkins

David N. Perkins

Harvard Graduate School of Education, Project Zero
David Perkins is the Carl H. Pforzheimer, Jr., Research Professor of Teaching and Learning at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, recently retired from the Senior Faculty. He has conducted long-term programs of research and development in the areas of teaching and learning for... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 9:00am - 10:45am PST
Fellowship Hall Second Presbyterian Church

11:15am PST

Strand A Talk -- Carrie James: Cultivating the Good in a Digital World: Opportunities and Challenges for Educators

Digital media—including use of mobile phones, tablets, computers, and sites like Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube—are integral to most young people’s lives today. Indeed, most young people can't imagine their lives without them. The positive and negative implications for learning are being widely discussed. Arguably, the implications for ethics and citizenship are equally important. In this session, Project Zero researcher Carrie James will explore the moral, ethical and civic dimensions of our increasingly digital lives. She will attend to the related opportunities and the challenges for educators seeking to cultivate digital citizenship.


Speakers
avatar for Carrie James

Carrie James

Principal Investigator, Harvard Project Zero
Carrie James is a Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Project Zero, and a Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research explores young people’s digital, moral, and civic lives.


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 12:15am PST
Fellowship Hall Second Presbyterian Church

11:15am PST

A Beautiful Mess: Where Visible Thinking Routines and Culture of Thinking Collide

How can we use student work to strengthen our classroom's Culture of Thinking? The course leaders—both teachers in an urban parochial school—will invite participants to examine what happens when the themes of Building a Culture of Thinking and Making Thinking and Learning Visible collide. Participants will use  thinking routines to access student thinking while also reflecting on their own classroom cultures and thinkers. The group will explore multiple examples of authentic student work to gain insight into how our learners contribute to a class culture. We will also learn how educators can allow for students to help shape class culture by identifying pivotal points in learners' thinking, providing opportunities for further student-driven investigation, and inviting personal reflection on learning.

Intended Audience: General with encouragement towards Language Arts teachers. 


Speakers
avatar for Kristen Kullberg

Kristen Kullberg

MS Language Arts/Instructional Coach, Sacred Heart School
Kristen Kullberg is the middle school Language Arts teacher and Arts Integration Instructional Coach at Sacred Heart School in Washington, DC.  Her dual role has allowed her to learn alongside students in PreK3 through 8th grade as they develop close looking, critical thinking, and... Read More →
avatar for Jodi Bossio Smith

Jodi Bossio Smith

ELL Coordinator, DC Bilingual Public Charter School
Jodi Bossio has been working as an educator for over 12 years in urban settings and has taught students in first grade through postgraduate education.  She has a Master’s degree in education and is highly qualified in both English as a Second Language and English Teaching, with... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D202 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

A Journey of Reflection through a Routine

Teachers and administrators participating in this interactive course will take a journey with the presenters through their last school year and learn how a bi-weekly staff gathering to study the changes in teacher and student learning energized and transformed how the staff documented and assessed student growth across content areas. Throughout the course participants will be provided opportunities to engage in thinking routines and protocols as well as view them in action. The course presenters, the principal and an experienced teacher in the school, have been working directly with the Cultures of Thinking project in Oakland County, Michigan.

Intended Audience:  Elementary teachers and administrators


Speakers
KS

Karen Sinclair

4th grade Teacher, Pine Knob Elementary, Clarkston Community Schools
JY

Jodi Yeloushan

Principal, Pine Knob Elementary, Clarkston Community Schools


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D111 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Activating Cultural Forces to Promote Language and Literacy Development in Bilingual Settings

This course will provide insight into Visible Thinking ideas in connection with some of the current research on language and literacy development. Human beings have a built-in capacity to be curious, meet challenges and accomplish goals. In classrooms where cultural forces are used to engage children in collective and individual thinking and make their thinking visible, we have certain lenses through which to view precursors to language and literacy development. The presenters, who are early childhood researchers, will address the cultural force of teacher-student interactions in the context of ways to make children’s thinking visible and scaffold metacognitive skills. Participants will engage in an activity using thinking routines with the aim of uncovering their own thinking. They will also see examples from various classrooms and examine them through the lens of the cultural forces framework.

Intended Audience:  Preschool and primary grades


Speakers
avatar for Maria Victoria Gangotena

Maria Victoria Gangotena

Kindergarten Teacher, Shelton Academy
avatar for Angela K. Salmon

Angela K. Salmon

Associate Professor, Florida International University
I am an Associate Professor and Director of the Early Childhood Program in the Department of Teaching and Learning at Florida International University in Miami. I am also the founder and leader of the Visible Thinking South Florida Initiative, recently renamed the National Association... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D218 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

An Invitation to Imagination, Creativity, Innovation, and Collaboration – with Robots!

In this session, the presenters will share details of an interdisciplinary project inspired by the work in preschools of Reggio Emilia, Italy. Participants will examine interactions between students and teachers engaged in the process of documenting connections between science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics. Key principles of documentation will be presented, explained and discussed interactively.  Special attention will be given to how each of five strategies for promoting learning in groups was employed during the project. Throughout the session, participants will be invited to share their personal experiences, and relate them to the approaches presented.

Intended Audience:  General


Speakers
avatar for Ken Graham

Ken Graham

About Ken GrahamAssistant Superintendent, Hauppauge Public Schools, Hauppauge, NY Ken Graham has provided leadership in technology innovation for 25 years as Assistant Superintendent and Director of Educational Technology in several Long Island, New York school districts. He recently... Read More →
avatar for Evelina Sarles

Evelina Sarles

teacher, Portledge School
Evelina Sarles has taught science to children for 30 years. Portledge's recent paradigm shift to the Reggio Emilia philosophy and Project Zero has been exciting.


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D112 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Bodies at Rest, Minds in Motion: Using Thinking Routines in a Large “Lecture” Physical Science Course

Large lecture courses and the associated transmission model of learning they employ are still the dominant way students are taught science at the university level. This becomes especially problematic for those individuals who aspire to become teachers, as the one-way flow of information serves to implant a view of science as discrete content to be consumed vs. science as a way of thinking and knowing. If we want teachers to create a culture of thinking in their classroom, they must experience the process first-hand – to engage, struggle, question, explore and build their own understandings. Participants will be active learners in the session as the presenter, a teacher preparation and physical science educator, will share concrete examples of thinking routines applied to physical science content. The purpose will be to engage participants in discussion based on Making Thinking Visible principles – particularly in the use of thinking routines as tools within teacher education to improve teacher preparation.

Intended Audience:  Higher Education, Science, Teacher Education (but all are welcome)


Speakers
SS

Scott Sander

Miami University


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D212 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Building a Culture of Thinking in a Mathematics Classroom

In this course, the presenters, both secondary math teachers in an international school with a demanding curriculum, will demonstrate five thinking routines that have proven to be particularly relevant in developing mathematical thinking: Claim-Support-Question, Get ICE, Connect-Extend-Challenge, I Used to Think…Now I Think, and See-Think-Wonder. Participants will develop their own lesson plans using one or more of the demonstrated thinking routines. Finally, the presenters will provide examples of how they use collaborative student learning as a means for promoting a culture of thinking in the classroom.

Intended Audience:  MS and US mathematics teachers


Speakers
IH

Ingrid Hamso

Upper School Mathematics Teacher and an Assistant Examiner for the IB Program, Washington International School
Ingrid Hamso is an upper school mathematics teacher at Washington International School and an assistant examiner for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program.She has been teaching mathematics at WIS for 13 years and mathematics and physics in Norwegian public schools for 11... Read More →
VM

Victoria Mizzi

Upper School Mathematics Teacher, Washington International School
Victoria Mizzi is an Upper School mathematics teacher at Washington International School. She previously taught high school math at a public school near Toronto, Ontario. Victoria first attended the Project Zero Classroom in the summer of 2013 and the experience has greatly influenced... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D107 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Building a Culture of Thinking That Fosters Lifelong Learning

What impact do you expect your children to make on the world, and the world on them, 25 years from now? The 21st century requires changing the stories of teaching and learning. It´s time to rethink education so that we can nurture passionate, critical and creative thinkers, globally competent and empathetic students who are curious, aware and interested in interpreting the world and learning how it works. But where do we start, especially with very young children, ages 1 to 5? During this interactive course we will explore how to build learning environments where thinking is valued, visible and actively promoted, and where cultural forces dance together to create the most powerful thinking and learning experiences. We will also focus on how to foster thinking and understating opportunities through the use of thinking routines and documentation as tools to help students become aware or their thinking moves and make them visible. 

Intended Audience:  This course is intended for early childhood teachers, elementary teachers, administrators, principals and faculty, and can be presented in English or Spanish.


Speakers
avatar for Silvia Lopez Angel, M.Ed.

Silvia Lopez Angel, M.Ed.

Founder/Principal, BaBidiBu Early Childhood Education


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D217 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Building a Culture of Thinking with Instructional Rounds

“For classrooms to be cultures of thinking for students, schools must be cultures of thinking for teachers.” --Ron Ritchhart

This quotation by Ritchhart from Intellectual Character informs the approach to professional development at the presenters’ school.  They strive to create opportunities for teachers to engage in deep and rich discussion about their practice, one avenue for this being Instructional Rounds: “A specific set of ideas about how practitioners work together to solve common problems and to improve their practice” (Elmore, 2010). Rounds involve a network of teachers coming together to explore a common problem of practice, conduct structured peer visits, and then reflect on the patterns noticed from peer visits and what this means for teachers’ own practice. This course will help guide participants through a variety of activities to learn what the rounds process is and how it is being used to foster a culture of thinking in school.

Intended Audience:  Secondary teachers and instructional coaches


Speakers
BD

Bill DeMartini

Instructional Coach/Social Studies Teacher, Tyee Middle School
I am passionate about learning, reflecting on my practice, and working to create opportunities for my students to be intellectually engaged with the content I teach. I am also passionate about finding new and meaningful ways to work with my colleagues in my role as instructional... Read More →
avatar for Janel Hershey

Janel Hershey

Instructional Coach/8th grade Physics Teacher, Bellevue School District
I am passionate about creating a culture of thinking among my students through the lense of physics. I am highly engaged in conversations about how I can help students understand physics deeply by rigourous purposeful thinking moves I make as a teacher. I am also excited to think... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D203 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Building a Culture of Thinking: Articulation, Documentation, Reflection

Have you ever considered how you approach the creation and cultivation of your classroom culture? While some classrooms are plumping up their "academics" and priding themselves in their reputations for rigor, others are asking, "What makes sense in my classroom for my students right now?" As members of a learning community, we should be considering what types of activities, projects and assignments will really make the difference in the educational experiences of our students. Participants in this course, led by a kindergarten teacher, will explore questions such as: How do students approach learning? Are they engaged? Are they self-motivated? Will they be able to continue even if and when the teacher is not there? Using Project Zero ideas and routines, we will delve into ways teachers can use articulation, documentation and reflection to help create classrooms that value and encourage deep thinking from our youngest students.

Intended Audience:  Elementary educators


Speakers
avatar for Denise Coffin

Denise Coffin

Kindergarten Teacher, Sidwell Friends School
Denise Coffin teaches Kindergarten at Sidwell Friends School. She has been using Thinking Routines and other Project Zero ideas in her classroom for the past five years. She has been a presenter/exhibitor at several Looking at Student/Teacher Thinking exhibitions in Washington and... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D220 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Creating a Thinking Classroom: Using Thinking Routines to Motivate and Engage

What does it really mean to “think?” How can we create a culture of thinking in our classroom to motivate students to see themselves as thinkers? In this session, participants will examine the ways in which learners seek to understand and engage in several thinking routines that provide pathways for students to expand their thinking skills. The presenters, both teachers in an integrated arts school, will share their experience in using thinking routines to create a student-centered environment where thinking and questioning drive the learning process. As participants engage in learning through these routines, they will reflect on how creating a classroom where thinking is valued can help us engage students who are difficult to reach and build confidence in at-risk learners.

Intended Audience:  General



Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D213 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Developing a Culture of Thinking with Beginning Teachers

What are some initial steps that we can take to deepen engagement and create a culture of thinking in our classrooms? This session, designed for educators who work with beginning teachers, will address the first conference theme, how to create a culture of thinking, from the lens of teacher educators. In 2012, in an effort to strengthen their program, the presenters changed their student teaching seminar to include small cohorts led by nationally certified Critical Friends Group facilitators. In these cohorts, students experience several thinking routines that they can then add to their repertoire of pedagogical tools as they enter the classroom. They also adopted Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners as the core text for the seminar, so that students could learn about the ways that experienced teachers are using these thinking routines in their current practice. The current seminar engages students in a cycle of learning that involves experiencing a thinking routine and reading about how it can be used in practice, reflecting on that routine, integrating it into their own lesson and curriculum plans, and then sharing what they noticed with their faculty supervisors and peers. Then, for the capstone demonstration, pre-service teachers describe their own students’ responses to the thinking routines and reflect on what their students are learning. Participants in this workshop will engage in thinking routines and will look closely at artifacts from a beginning teacher’s practice. They will learn how to use these thinking routines in their own teaching or how to support colleagues in using them.

Intended Audience: General  


Speakers
avatar for Janet Chance

Janet Chance

Director, Office of School & Community Collaborations, School of Education


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D201 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Developing a Sensitivity to Design: How Making and Design Experiences Can Activate Student Agency

Since the first Maker Faire was held in San Mateo, California, in 2006, the “maker movement”—the social embodiment of the contemporary DIY cultural resurgence—has generated international enthusiasm in the act of making. While hacker spaces, fablabs and 3-D printers have gripped the attention of adult makers, so too have they generated interest amongst teachers, parents and educational policymakers. But what does it mean to bring “maker” into education? What are the thinking and learning opportunities present during a maker experience? During this course, Project Zero researchers from the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative will partner with educators from Oakland, CA, representing the action research strand of their work. Participants will engage in a series of hands-on activities to explore some of the benefits of making and design in education, including a “tinkering” activity designed to encourage close and critical looking at objects. The course will focus on two central questions: 1) How might maker learning experiences foster a sensitivity to the designed dimension of our world? 2) What role does having a sensitivity to design play in how young people engage with their world? Links will be made between participants’ experiences in this session and the potential for cultivating the agency—and design sensitivities—of young people in a variety of educational settings.

Intended Audience:  General


Speakers
avatar for Edward Clapp

Edward Clapp

Senior Research Manager, Project Zero
Edward P. Clapp is a senior research manager and a member of the core research team working on the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative—an investigation of the promises, practices, and pedagogies of maker-centered learning—at Project Zero, an educational research center at the Harvard... Read More →
JE

Jenny Ernst

Park Day School, Park Day School
Teaching math and science with 6th graders at a progressive school has been a dream career. At this independent school in Oakland, my values around social justice have been cultivated through professional development to deeply understand my students and the world we live in. My latest... Read More →
JR

Jen Ryan

Researcher, Project Manager, Project Zero
avatar for Brooke Toczyloweski

Brooke Toczyloweski

Art and Technology Teacher, Oakland International High School


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D225 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Developing Thinking, Understanding, and Reflecting Through Art and Literature

Learning thrives when students’ thinking is made visible and when there is time for student collaboration. This interactive presentation will give participants the opportunity to experience and learn about how using thinking routines with art and literature can enhance students’ thinking, understanding and reflection in an elementary classroom setting. Viewing documentation of student learning as they use these routines will give participants a sense of the way these students progressed in their understanding of the theme "Risks and Consequences" and in the process gained an understanding of their own and others' perspectives, while developing respect and empathy for others.

Intended Audience:  Elementary Teachers


Speakers
avatar for Tabbatha O'Donnell

Tabbatha O'Donnell

Upper Elementary Division Lead, Meyer Academy
Tabbatha O’Donnell is an elementary teacher with over 20 years of experience in grades K-5. She began her teaching career in Hawaii where she immersed in Hawaii’s multicultural environment, leading to a unique approach and sensitivity to teaching with a global perspective. Currently... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D200 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

I Can Do PBL, Too!: How Project-Based Learning and Thinking Routines Can Thrive in Any Classroom

This course will explore the idea that learning can thrive in the urban school environment by making content meaningful and contextualized for students. In combining principles of Project-Based Learning and Project Zero thinking routines, a team of inner-city teachers will demonstrate ways they have developed and implemented Project-Based Learning lessons. They have found that when students are taught in this way, they are much more likely to become lovers of learning. Participants in this session will have a hands-on experience with a mini-PBL unit, and leave understanding how to implement it in their classroom.

Intended Audience:  Any teacher looking for ways to make learning student-based, exciting, and meaningful, especially teachers who feel dominated by teaching to the “test” and relying on student data. Presenters will focus on teaching in a public and charter school setting.



Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D208 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Making the Invisible Visible: Thinking Strategies that Promote Understanding

This session, led by two elementary school teachers, will aim to be a time of modeling, practicing, reflecting and empowering. It will address ways thinking routines can promote greater understanding for both students and teachers as well as techniques that the presenters have used to document the thinking and learning process. After engaging with a broad use of thinking routines across subject areas and grade levels, participants will examine various collaborative experiences that can help build a culture of thinking and learning in a classroom, and ultimately a school. The bulk of the session will be devoted to viewing and discussing video footage of thinking routines in practice in classrooms and to developing ways to use several thinking routines effectively.

Intended Audience:  K-5 teachers and administrators


Speakers
avatar for Heather Fisher

Heather Fisher

Master Teacher, Shelby County Schools
I have been teaching 17 years. I have a doctorate in Educational Leadership. I worked two years as President, Shelby County Education Association. I am currently a Master Teacher at Dogwood Elementary School. Since attending Project Zero at Harvard in 2012, I am passionate about incorporating... Read More →
avatar for Karen Vogelsang, NBCT

Karen Vogelsang, NBCT

3rd Grade Teacher, Shelby County Schools - Winridge Elementary
I am a second career teacher and I have been teaching for fourteen years. I have a Bachelors Degree in Business Administration and a Masters Degree in Elementary Education. I served as Tennessee's 2015 Tennessee Teacher of the Year. I currently serve as Hope Street Group Fellow... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D226 Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Making Thinking Visible Through a Whole New Game

How do we make students’ thinking visible? Inspired by John Hunter’s World Peace Game, two second grade teachers at Presbyterian Day School created Zoolandia as a way to engage learners with the core idea of setting up conflict between four groups.  Students assume roles in designing and operating a zoo to simulate real world situations, deal with biological and environmental crises, and engage in a game that requires learners to think in the discipline of biology. Learning thrives in this example of David Perkins’ concept of playing the junior version  of the whole game as students solve meaningful challenges. In this course participants will learn how to adapt the core idea of making thinking visible through game play to their discipline or content area. They will have an opportunity to design and begin to create their own game around the essential understandings and throughlines they have for their students.

Intended Audience:  K-12


Speakers
avatar for Beth Diaz

Beth Diaz

2ND GRADE TEACHER, PRESBYTERIAN DAY SCHOOL
Previously serving as a reading specialist, a teacher of gifted students, and a middle school teacher, Beth Diaz has spent many years at Presbyterian Day School as a teacher in first and second grades. Along with her students, Beth is interested in writing and blogging. Using the... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Ann Taylor

Stephanie Ann Taylor

Teacher, Presbyterian Day School
I teach a classroom full of 2nd grade boys at Presbyterian Day School. In my classroom I enjoy finding ways to allow my students to learn for themselves, and creating an environment where students are led by what they want to know and understand. I am a third year teacher with a Bachelors... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
1404B Presbyterian Day School

11:15am PST

Visible Thinking as a Tool for Creating a Community of Thinkers in a School – Students, Teachers, Administrators, and Parents

In this course, led by an original member of the Visible Thinking project in Sweden, participants will experience how to build a culture of thinking in the entire school community—students, teachers, administrators and parents—and  how to sustain it when ”core” leaders leave. We will focus on the importance of inviting teachers and parents into the process to make thinking visible in the classrooms. Participants will be introduced to a number of thinking routines, which can be used in different settings, subjects and social situations—for example, with students, with teachers at faculty meetings and with parents at evening meetings. Participants also will have the opportunity to collaboratively develop their thinking  about how to start and/or deepen the work with Visbile Thinking at their schools.

Intended Audience:  Teachers in all grades and subjects, school leaders


Speakers
LN

Lotta Norell

Educator, NUKAB
Lotta Norell has been a teacher for many, many years. Now she is educating teachers, mostly in Sweden, about Visible Thinking. Lotta was the coordinator for the project” Making Thinking Visible” at Lemshaga Academy, Sweden 2000-2005. That was the beginning of Visible Thinking. Lotta... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 11:15am - 1:15pm PST
D206 Presbyterian Day School

12:15pm PST

Strand A Lunch
Thursday February 13, 2014 12:15pm - 1:15pm PST
Gymnasium Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Strand B Lunch
Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 2:15pm PST
Gymnasium Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Can "Itty Bittys" Really Get the "Nitty Gritty"

How can early childhood educators incorporate thinking routines into the daily activities of three, four and five year olds?  Participants will leave having a better understanding of a variety of thinking routines, presented by an early childhood classroom teacher and the Head of Early Childhood at Presbyterian Day School. The presenters will provide ways to modify curriculum to enhance understanding, as well as ways to engage the student as an active participant in expanding his/her learning as the hub of the educational process. Participants will explore activities that contribute to the creation of a culture of thinking in the early childhood classroom.

Intended Audience:  Pre-Kindergarten through 2nd grade teaches and administrators


Speakers
avatar for Holly Lindsey

Holly Lindsey

Senior Kindergarten Teacher, Presbyterian Day School
Holly Lindsey has a Master’s degree in Early Childhood Education from the University of Memphis in Memphis, TN and a Bachelor’s degree in Infant and Child Development from Delta State University in Cleveland, MS. She has worked at Presbyterian Day School in Memphis, TN for the... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
EC1127 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Connecting Museum and Classroom: Art and Poetry
How can the use of art and museum visits change and deepen student learning?  In what ways might purposeful artful thinking routines enrich student expression in the language arts classroom? While exploring Project Zero ideas, the presenter, a middle school teacher, found new ways to bring artful thinking into the classroom. She hoped to see what would happen if students took time in a museum to look deeply at a work of art before writing. Working with an educator at the National Gallery of Art, Rebecca developed a structured thinking routine that allowed her to explore what happened to both teacher and student thinking along the way.

Intended Audience: General
 

Speakers

Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
D209 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Connecting Student Learning, Thinking Routines, and Formative Assessment
This course, led by a middle school principal, will provide hands-on opportunities to see visible thinking used in conjunction with formative assessment practices. Participants will engage in a variety of learning experiences to begin their own thinking about the journey of learning in the classroom. We will use thinking routines and a protocol to see how the process of formative assessment can be used not only to make student thinking visible, but to guide instruction on a daily basis. Together, we will look at teacher and student evidence to understand ways to build a culture of thinking in the classroom.

Intended Audience:  General

 

Speakers
TC

Tina Chambers

Principal, Brandon Middle School


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
EC1103 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Creating a Culture of Learning: Thinking Routines to Establish Agreements & Expectations

The beginning of the school year is a crucial time for establishing expectations and routines for students and teachers. In order for the students to take ownership of their learning, they need to begin conversations about learning and have a metacognitive awareness about how that learning should look. They also need to develop effective communication skills and have many shared experiences in working together, in both small and large groups. Building a culture of thinking and learning helps to develop intrinsic motivation and encourages thoughtful approaches to topics throughout the year. The presenters, elementary school teachers, will share their experience in using thinking routines to create classroom agreements at the start of the year. Participants will explore ways to use these ideas in their classroom as well.

Intended Audience:  Classroom teachers grades 3-6


Speakers
LL

Leslie Lemma

5th Grade Teacher, Portledge School
SM

Sara McInerney

5th Grade Teacher, Portledge School


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
D108 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Creating The Comfort Zone: Strategies for Engaging Different Learners Through Creativity and the Arts

While it is not difficult to create arts activities that will excite both student and teacher, educators need to model the creative behavior that is expected from our students. The presenter, an arts integration specialist, will guide participants in developing a creative/artistic toolkit that will allow educators in any domain to identify opportunities for success for students who may otherwise be labeled behavior problems or a non-participants. In this interactive course, participants will use various entry points into creating art and engage with feedback protocols drawn from the arts. 

Intended Audience:  ECE-Middle School


Speakers
avatar for Rob Levit

Rob Levit

Arts Integration Specialist/Executive Director, Creating Communities
"Thanks so very much Rob! Your session during the conference was absolutely phenomenal. Talk about differentiated instruction – you have it mastered. Your passion, enthusiasm, instructional approach, emotional appeal and invitation to make the “Spirit of Caring” our first love... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
EC1125 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Developing Creative Thinking Using Project Zero Ideas

How do we teach our students to think creatively? In this hands-on workshop, a language/literature teacher will engage participants in ways she has brought out creative thinking in the classroom using a variety of thinking routines. From her experience taking an online professional development course on Visible Thinking, attending workshops with Project Zero consultants, and collaborating with colleagues, she has included in her pedagogy ways for students to think metaphorically, draw meaningful connections and make their thinking visible, leading to deeper connections with content. Participants will experience several thinking routines and explore how to adapt them to their own settings. 


Speakers
avatar for Carole Geneix

Carole Geneix

Teacher, Washington International School
Carole Geneix is a French language and literature teacher at Washington International School. She is also an assistant examiner for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program. She has been teaching literature and French as a foreign language in private and public schools around... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
D100 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Discourse in the Cultures of Thinking Classroom

How do conversation, language and discussion in a “culture of thinking” classroom differ from the notion of a traditional classroom? How do we understand effective discourse patterns, versus ineffective ones, so that we as teachers can better foster powerful learning communities? This course, led by Project Zero researcher Ron Ritchhart, will focus on current research conducted by the Cultures of Thinking research team at Project Zero in the area of discourse. Drawing on current work in the field, this session will allow participants to examine practices that can help teachers at all grade levels and across subject areas create a culture of thinking and that encourage deep understanding in students. Participants will explore the way educators can use thinking routines designed to facilitate thinking while structuring the discourse of the classroom. 

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Ron Ritchhart

Ron Ritchhart

Principal Investigator, HGSE Project Zero
Ron Ritchhart is a Senior Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Harvard Project Zero where his work focuses on the development of school and classroom culture as prime vehicles for developing students’ as powerful thinkers and learners.  Ron’s most recent book, Creating... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
Hussey Commons Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Disturbance: Engaging Students through Ideas of Wide Scope

This interactive course will invite participants to examine an “idea of wide scope”(D. Perkins) as they explore the role disturbance could play in changing educational practices in ways that are responsive to 21st Century learning environments, whether those practices are at the level of policy creation, administrative decision making, classroom interaction, or digital contexts.  We will examine ideas about disturbance from several viewpoints, using Thinking Routines.  Examples of current dilemmas found in educational contexts will be used to prompt discussion.  Throughout the session, participants will be encouraged to reflect on their own ideas and practices so as to highlight areas of change they can enact in their own settings.

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Janet Navarro

Janet Navarro

Professor, Grand Valley State University
Equity Open-mindedness Kindness Joy My Family Summer at the Lake
RR

Rod Rock

Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
D102 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Making Thinking and Learning Visible: Creating an Environment Where Learning and Understanding Thrive

In this course, led by a fifth grade teacher and a media specialist, participants will experience first-hand how learning thrives in an environment that is immersed in a culture of thinking. Through the use of thinking routines, professional conversation and personal reflection, participants will walk away with a deep understanding and personal connection that they can apply immediately in their professional practice. The session will provide opportunities to engage in using thinking routines to examine their own mindset regarding thinking and learning; to view and evaluate student learning spaces and create their own design; to examine and evaluate student artifacts in collaborative setting; to view video clips, making note of evidence of the use of the eight cultural forces and their impact on student learning; create an integration plan for using thinking routines within their curriculum; and create a plan to foster a culture of thinking - an atmosphere where collaboration, self-discovery, creativity and global connections are the natural fabric of the learning in their own classroom/building.

Intended Audience:  School Administration, Elementary Teachers and Co-curricular Teachers


Speakers
avatar for Sharon Crain

Sharon Crain

Instructional Technologist, Clarkston Community Schools
I have been in education for 24 years and for the last 18 years have been a classroom teacher and media specialist. I am passionate about bringing thinking and learning alive for everyone I meet, whether it be children or adults. Igniting the desire in others to think and learn in... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
D110 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Making Your Mark: Using Visible Thinking to Promote Creative and Collaborative Thinking

This course will explore ways to encourage collaborative and creative thinking in children (and adults) by making their thinking and learning visible using thinking routines. Participants will leave the course with examples and strategies for how to encourage creativity and habits of mind relevant to all disciplines, and how to make thinking and learning visible to support effective collaboration. The presenters, part of an arts interdisciplinary team at the elementary school level, will demonstrate how the creative process can be collaborative, and the dispositions and habits of mind it develops. They will describe not only how these processes encourage creativity and act as a force for student learning, but also how the routines provide documentation of the creative process, making it explicit. Participants will engage in this process and create a digital composition together using thinking routines to structure, support and reflect on the process.

Intended Audience:  General, (Presenters work with Pre-K-2nd grade students in the fine arts and with technology, and provide professional development for adults, but will share concepts applicable to all educators)


Speakers
avatar for Alison Keller

Alison Keller

Technology Facilitator, Glenview School District 34
I am a Technology Facilitator at a primary school in Glenview, IL. In this position, I work with kids and teachers to support their use of technology in the classroom. We are currently moving toward a 1:1 iPad environment for the entire district (K-8). I also work closely with... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
EC1126 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Out of Eden Learn: Where “Slow Learning” Meets Social Media

In the frenzied pace of school life, students (and teachers) rarely have time to consider big questions about themselves and humanity as a whole. How do our lives relate to place? How are we connected to other human beings? How do we as individuals fit into a bigger story of human history?  Where as a species are we collectively headed? In this course, the presenters, both Project Zero researchers on the Out of Eden Learn project, will draw from Project Zero’s collaboration with prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek, whose seven-year Out of Eden Walk involves retracing the migratory pathways of our ancient human ancestors and generating “slow journalism”. Participants will engage in a variety of activities that encourage students both to learn from the stories and perspectives of others as well as to reflect in new ways about themselves and the wider world. While we will introduce participants to our free, online learning community for middle and high school students, our activities will also be applicable to “off-line” classroom contexts. The course is open to all but may be of particular interest to history, geography and social studies educators.


Speakers
avatar for Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Principal Investigator, Project Zero
I've been playing a leading role with Out of Eden Learn, Project Zero's new online learning community to accompany journalist Paul Salopek's epic walk around the world. I'm a former history teacher and I'm particularly interested in making history and social studies more personally... Read More →
avatar for Carrie James

Carrie James

Principal Investigator, Harvard Project Zero
Carrie James is a Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Project Zero, and a Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research explores young people’s digital, moral, and civic lives.


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
E111 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Portledge School: A Story of Transformation

How does change happen and take hold in a school setting? In this course, explore the way two noted change agents have used frameworks and big ideas to powerful effect in a number of settings. Using practices inspired by Project Zero and the preschools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, principal Alan Cohen has led pubic and private schools to make transformational shifts. Best-selling author and co-founder of the Tribeca Film Festival, Craig Hatkoff has worked with the Disruptive Innovation Theory to challenge traditional models of schooling. In this course, participants will experience thinking routines and protocols as  the course delves into the major theme of the conference, How and Where Does Learning Thrive?

Intended Audience:  Administrators and Teachers


Speakers
avatar for Alan D. Cohen

Alan D. Cohen

Lower School Head, Portledge School
Alan is a seasoned administrator having filled many roles: teacher and administrator for the New York City Department of Education, Network Leader providing support and supervision for principals in 32 New York City schools, principal of P.S. 69 in the Bronx, and for the past three... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
D112 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Putting Young Learners On The Path To Understanding

The better children understand the world, the more effectively they will be able to participate in and engage with it. Our children are likely to work and live in communities that are rapidly changing and more diverse, and will be called upon to interact with people who observe different norms and have different points of view. They will need mental agility to interact successfully in new and unique situations. This is why in the 21st century, educating for understanding and developing the critical thinking skills to achieve it are more important than ever. What does it mean to teach for understanding? How will this approach better equip students for life in the 21st century? How can deeper understanding best be developed in an elementary school classroom? What role do thinking routines play in this process? What will understanding look like once it is achieved? These are some of the questions that will be considered in this course, as the presenter, an elementary school teacher, shares how the Teaching For Understanding framework and Cultures of Thinking principles brought about an important shift in her approach to teaching, stimulated critical thinking and inquiry in her classroom, and ultimately resulted in a deeper understanding of topics studied.

Intended Audience:  The presentation is directed at a general audience but the examples will be from elementary school and so might be better appreciated by an elementary school audience.


Speakers

Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
EC1130 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Revolution and Evolution: How We Transformed a Building of Adult and Student Thinkers

Using a workshop model approach, the course presenters—both elementary school teachers—will give participants an overview of the six years of learning with Visible Thinking at various grade levels as well as the creative arts. From there we will showcase current units of study across content and grade level that have been guided and developed through the use of the planning frame. Presenters will walk our guests through the journey that we ourselves have taken in creating lessons as teachers in a Culture of Thinking.  We will share the revisions, reflections, learning and understanding that continue to take place each and every year.  Presenters will share samples of student thinking in connection to the units being discussed and further develop an understanding of how these visual representations of thinking are used to guide instruction.  Participants will be invited to reflect on what is being presented, become familiar with the LAST protocol,  and share their insights identifying where opportunities for thinking have been created and what possibilities have yet to be explored. Opting for practice over theory, conference attendees will be invited to work on the instructional design of personal units of study in the company of immediate colleagues.

Intended Audience:  Elementary educators K-5



Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
EC1129 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Telling the Stories of Teacher and Student Learning: PZ Ideas in Professional Development Settings

In this course, participants will focus first on their own questions about their professional practice. The group will then examine guiding questions developed by teachers who have exhibited their learning as well as their students’ in a public exhibition. The presenter, a middle school English teacher and the coordinator of the public exhibition, will engage the group in an exploration of how documentation “worked” (both in practice and in the learning that followed), what was added by the visible reflection threads, and where the work might go next. Participants will reflect together on connections between their initial questions and the possibilities occurring to them in working with the new material. They will leave  the course with a list of Project Zero resources, a cohort of practitioners in the group to use as a support network, and new questions to pursue. 

Intended Audience:  General; Professional Development


Speakers
avatar for Anne Charny

Anne Charny

Teacher, 7th & 8th Grade, Sidwell Friends School
Anne Charny teaches grades 7-8 English at Sidwell Friends Middle School. She began teaching in the Peace Corps in the Central African Republic in 1975; since then she has taught high school English in public and private schools in Washington and the Boston area, as well as at the... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
EC1132 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

The Influence of Thinking, Creativity, and Culture on Professional Development and Student Learning

When teachers learn together and make their learning public with one another, learning thrives. Over several years, a Massachusetts public school district combined forces with Project Zero researchers to help faculty question pedagogy and the role of creative and innovative teaching and learning. Learn about how a PK-12 professional development experience called Creative Classroom transformed learning for teachers and students. The presenters of this course, an arts administrator/program developer and a fifth grade teacher, will share their perspectives on how this professional development experience influenced their thinking and the learning of others. What does it mean to have a creative classroom? How does having a creative classroom connect with and influence curriculum, classroom structure, expectations, and culture? How do students benefit from being part of a creative classroom? Participants will discuss approaches and experience strategies used in a creative classroom. They will also discuss how these tools and ideas can be adapted for use in their own settings.

Intended Audience:  Teachers PK-12 (all disciplines), Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Natalie Boes Belli

Natalie Boes Belli

Grade 5 language arts and social studies teacher, Village School
Grade 5 humanities teacher -- I am passionate about learning and improving student understanding. I make thinking visible and organic by layering and extending thinking routines in a nontraditional classroom setting. My classroom has been described as a networking, researching... Read More →
avatar for Beth Delforge

Beth Delforge

Pk-12 Visual & Performing Arts Program Coordinator, Andover Public Schools
My passions include understanding and enjoying the creative process as a visual artist, an educator, and an observer of others (students, teachers, administrators) involved in the creative process. I am passionate about building a community of inquiry where the meaning of learning... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
EC1108 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

The Thinking Body: How Does Movement Inform the Mind?

This course, led by an accomplished choreographer and dancer, will explore active learning through the lens of dance/movement. We will discuss current research in cognitive neuroscience and then explore the creative process in a simple exercise in choreography. The composition (designed for any skill level of participant) will be used to look at creative practice and the  dispositions that are embedded within the process. We will refer to Multiple Intelligences and Teaching for Understanding throughout the course and make connections to academic curriculum to make explict the way artful thinking is valuable across all aspects of education.

Intended Audience:  General 


Speakers

Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
Dunavant Fitness Center Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Thinking Lab: One Science Teacher, One Art Teacher … An Experiment in Collaboration and Creativity

In this course, the presenters will share their experience in creating an interdisciplinary classroom called the Thinking Lab at the Environmental Charter School in Pittsburgh, PA, for K-3 students. By facilitating an experience where students work with an art teacher and science teacher to explore, create, build and communicate, students are able to establish meaningful connections between the disciplines of science, art and design. Over the past year and a half, the practices of the educators in the Thinking Lab have evolved from basic integration to using a maker mentality and design thinking to help children solve complex problems and communicate through art making. While the Thinking Lab is an iterative and evolving classroom, we see through the assessment of thinking a great deal of power in incorporating artmaking into science content instruction. Participants will be able to practice several human-centered design methods that they can take back to their classrooms/schools. Together we will go through a series of design methods and thinking routines similar to those that we use both with children and faculty to explore the question,"How might we foster creativity in the elementary school setting?"

Intended Audience:  K-5 Educators and Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Shannon Merenstein

Shannon Merenstein

Thinking Lab Educator/ Design Coach, Environmental Charter School


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
EC1128 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Using Thinking Routines to Develop Reflective Dispositions in Young Mathematicians

What role does reflection have on mathematical understanding, and how can teachers facilitate the development of reflective dispositions in young mathematicians? Participants in this course—led by two teachers in urban Washington, D.C., schools—will engage in discourse about the role of reflection in mathematical understanding by generating a list of thinking moves that develop a reflective disposition. We will aim to connect these move to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice as ways to engage students of all grade levels in mathematically complex tasks. Throughout the session, participants will engage in a variety of thinking routines that promote and deepen reflective dispositions. Participants will reflect on authentic student work by using a thinking routine, engage in a mathematical inquiry using an individual and group problem solving process, and then reflect upon shifts in their own thinking and understanding at the end of the course.

Intended Audience:  Math elementary and middle school teachers


Speakers
avatar for Elise Heil

Elise Heil

Middle School Math Teacher, Sacred Heart School
I am a middle school math teacher and math coach in Washington DC. I have attended the Project Zero Classroom twice at Harvard University over the past few years and have immersed myself in their work. As a part of DC-PZ, a group of DC based educators interested in Project Zero ideas... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
D211 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Using Visible Thinking and Global Thinking Routines as a Vehicle to Nurture Empathy in Preschoolers
How can our early childhood classrooms nurture global thinkers? How do recognizing the brain’s role in regulating emotions and understanding the way emotions affect other people help us to shape empathetic preschoolers in the classroom? This course, led by an early childhood education researcher and a preschool teacher, will offer opportunities to analyze how thinking routines and global thinking routines engage preschoolers in the nurturing of global habits of mind. Special emphasis will be given to how preschoolers become aware of their own emotions, as well as those of others in the classroom. When children are able to recognize their own feelings and manage those feelings, they are more likely to identify emotions in others and help them come back to their regular state of mind. 

Participants will experience global thinking routines that have been designed to nurture global competence in young children.
 
Intended Audience:  This course is intended for: early childhood teachers, elementary teachers, administrators, and faculty. 

Speakers
avatar for Daniela Fenu-Foerch

Daniela Fenu-Foerch

Instructor, Florida International University


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
EC1101 Presbyterian Day School

1:15pm PST

Working To The Core of Math, One Layer at a Time

Learning thrives when students feel comfortable to take risks and learn from their mistakes. Sometimes there are no right or wrong answers, and getting students to simply think about numbers and their role evolves into creative problem solving. There can be more than one way to solve a problem! After years of using thinking routines in their math curriculum, the presenters, two upper elementary math teachers, will share ways they have added many layers to the learning inside and outside the walls of the classroom. This journey has resulted in students taking ownership for their learning and thinking like problem solvers.

Intended Audience:  Math Teachers (K-12)


Speakers
SL

Susan Love

Presbyterian Day School
WM

Windy May

Teacher, Presbyterian Day School
Since graduating from the University of Mississippi with a Masters degree in math education, Windy May has experienced a wide range of classrooms, teaching high school honors geometry, as well as middle school and elementary math. Throughout the years, Windy’s professional development... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 1:15pm - 3:15pm PST
D214 Presbyterian Day School

2:15pm PST

Strand B Talk -- Veronica Boix Mansilla: Educating for Global Competence: Preparing Our Youth for Today's World

The world for which we are preparing students today is fundamentally different from the one we experienced growing up. Today's societies are marked by new economic, cultural, technological and environmental trends that are part of a rapid and uneven wave of globalization. In this context, thoughtful educators ask: What matters most in choosing what to teach in an increasingly interdependent world? What skills and dispositions should students develop to address the global issues defining their times? In this session, Veronica Boix Mansilla will examine the nature of global competence as a promising aim of education in the 21st century. We shall define global competence as the capacity and disposition to understand and act on issues of global significance. Advanced by the US Council of Chief State School Officers and the Asia Society, this view of global competence highlights its disciplinary and interdisciplinary grounding, students’ capacity to investigate the world beyond their immediate environment, their capacity to take perspective, to communicate across difference and to take creative and responsible action.  Through analysis of a student’s work we will discern what global competence looks like, and how it might be assessed and nurtured by multiple stakeholders in our educational communities.


Speakers
avatar for Veronica Boix Mansilla

Veronica Boix Mansilla

Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Veronica Boix Mansilla is a principal investigator and Steering Committee member at Project Zero, HGSE, where she leads the IdGlobal Project and chairs the Future of Learning Institute. With a background in cognitive science, human development and education, she examines how to prepare... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 2:15pm - 3:15pm PST
Fellowship Hall Second Presbyterian Church

3:30pm PST

Closing Plenary Session -- Ron Ritchhart: Creating Cultures of Thinking: The 8 Forces We Must Master to Truly Transform Our Schools
If we want our students to be 21st century learners--able to understand new content, apply what they know, solve problems, and innovate--then we must have schools that are cultures of thinking, actively engaging students in thinking as the core of the learning enterprise. Creating such environments entails a fundamental shift, away from the simplistic notion that curriculum is merely something that teachers deliver, and toward the idea that curriculum is something teachers enact with students as part of a dynamic and creative process existing within the cultural context of the school and classroom. In this talk, Ron Ritchhart will argue that this means we as educators must master the forces that shape group culture if we want to truly transform our schools into places that facilitate the development of 21st century learners.

Speakers
avatar for Ron Ritchhart

Ron Ritchhart

Principal Investigator, HGSE Project Zero
Ron Ritchhart is a Senior Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Harvard Project Zero where his work focuses on the development of school and classroom culture as prime vehicles for developing students’ as powerful thinkers and learners.  Ron’s most recent book, Creating... Read More →


Thursday February 13, 2014 3:30pm - 4:45pm PST
Fellowship Hall Second Presbyterian Church

5:00pm PST

Book Signing and Reception

Join your fellow conference attendees for refreshments and light hors d'ouvres, purchase Project Zero publications at our conference pop-up bookshop, and have your purchases signed by the authors!

Cash or credit cards accepted.

Thursday February 13, 2014 5:00pm - 6:00pm PST
Room C100 Second Presbyterian Church
 
Friday, February 14
 

9:00am PST

Opening Plenary Session -- Shari Tishman: Project Zero Perspectives on Learning

Since 1967, Project Zero has examined the development of learning processes in children, adults and organizations. Through scores of research projects, it has investigated the nature of intelligence, understanding, thinking, creativity, ethics and other essential aspects of human learning. While the ideas and frameworks developed at Project Zero over the decades are diverse, they all share some common themes, which together coalesce into a distinct perspective on learning. This presentation aims to uncover what’s distinctive about a Project Zero perspective on learning. Drawing on examples from from current and former projects, it explores how Project Zero’s new work builds on ideas from several past and current projects, especially those represented at this conference.


Speakers
avatar for Shari Tishman

Shari Tishman

Principal Investigator, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Project Zero
Shari Tishman is a Lecturer at Harvard Graduate School of Education and a Senior Research Associate at Harvard Project Zero, where she recently served as Director. Her research focuses on the development of thinking and understanding, the role of close observation in learning, and... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 9:00am - 10:30am PST
Fellowship Hall Second Presbyterian Church

11:00am PST

Strand A Talk -- Tina Blythe: Building a Culture of Thinking for Teachers and Administrators

If we want our schools to be places where students can engage in deep thinking and learning, then they also have to be places where teachers and administrators also engage in deep thinking and learning. In this presentation, we take collaboration as the starting point for professional learning that routinely brings colleagues together to think deeply about their students' learning as well as their own. We consider the misconceptions and challenges that make this kind of collaborative learning so difficult and what research has to say about these puzzles.


Speakers

Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 12:00am PST
Fellowship Hall Second Presbyterian Church

11:00am PST

A Beautiful Mess: Where Visible Thinking Routines and Culture of Thinking Collide

How can we use student work to strengthen our classroom's Culture of Thinking? The course leaders—both teachers in an urban parochial school—will invite participants to examine what happens when the themes of Building a Culture of Thinking and Making Thinking and Learning Visible collide. Participants will use  thinking routines to access student thinking while also reflecting on their own classroom cultures and thinkers. The group will explore multiple examples of authentic student work to gain insight into how our learners contribute to a class culture. We will also learn how educators can allow for students to help shape class culture by identifying pivotal points in learners' thinking, providing opportunities for further student-driven investigation, and inviting personal reflection on learning.

Intended Audience: General with encouragement towards Language Arts teachers 


Speakers
avatar for Kristen Kullberg

Kristen Kullberg

MS Language Arts/Instructional Coach, Sacred Heart School
Kristen Kullberg is the middle school Language Arts teacher and Arts Integration Instructional Coach at Sacred Heart School in Washington, DC.  Her dual role has allowed her to learn alongside students in PreK3 through 8th grade as they develop close looking, critical thinking, and... Read More →
avatar for Jodi Bossio Smith

Jodi Bossio Smith

ELL Coordinator, DC Bilingual Public Charter School
Jodi Bossio has been working as an educator for over 12 years in urban settings and has taught students in first grade through postgraduate education.  She has a Master’s degree in education and is highly qualified in both English as a Second Language and English Teaching, with... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
D202 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Artful Thinking: Exploring the Power of Art to Strengthen Student Thinking and Learning

Artful Thinking, a program developed at Project Zero, uses the power of art to engage students in thinking-centered learning. The program is one of several school-based initiatives loosely linked by the theme of Making Thinking Visible. The specific goal of the Artful Thinking program is to help teachers regularly use works of visual art and music in their curriculum in ways that strengthen student thinking and deepen disciplinary learning.

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Jessica Ross

Jessica Ross

Researcher/Practioner, Project Zero
Jessica Ross is a senior practitioner specialist working at Project Zero on the Agency by Design Project.  Jessica was a founding team member of the Global Learning Charter Public School, where she taught grade 5-8 humanities for ten years.  A licensed principal, she has also served... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
Hussey Commons Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Bodies at Rest, Minds in Motion: Using Thinking Routines in a Large “Lecture” Physical Science Course

Large lecture courses and the associated transmission model of learning they employ are still the dominant way students are taught science at the university level. This becomes especially problematic for those individuals who aspire to become teachers, as the one-way flow of information serves to implant a view of science as discrete content to be consumed vs. science as a way of thinking and knowing. If we want teachers to create a culture of thinking in their classroom, they must experience the process first-hand – to engage, struggle, question, explore and build their own understandings. Participants will be active learners in the session as the presenter, a teacher preparation and physical science educator, will share concrete examples of thinking routines applied to physical science content. The purpose will be to engage participants in discussion based on Making Thinking Visible principles – particularly in the use of thinking routines as tools within teacher education to improve teacher preparation.

Intended Audience:  Higher Education, Science, Teacher Education (but all are welcome)


Speakers
SS

Scott Sander

Miami University


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
D212 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Building a Culture of Thinking: Articulation, Documentation, Reflection

Have you ever considered how you approach the creation and cultivation of your classroom culture? While some classrooms are plumping up their "academics" and priding themselves in their reputations for rigor, others are asking, "What makes sense in my classroom for my students right now?" As members of a learning community, we should be considering what types of activities, projects and assignments will really make the difference in the educational experiences of our students. Participants in this course, led by a kindergarten teacher, will explore questions such as: How do students approach learning? Are they engaged? Are they self-motivated? Will they be able to continue even if and when the teacher is not there? Using Project Zero ideas and routines, we will delve into ways teachers can use articulation, documentation and reflection to help create classrooms that value and encourage deep thinking from our youngest students.

Intended Audience:  Elementary educators


Speakers
avatar for Denise Coffin

Denise Coffin

Kindergarten Teacher, Sidwell Friends School
Denise Coffin teaches Kindergarten at Sidwell Friends School. She has been using Thinking Routines and other Project Zero ideas in her classroom for the past five years. She has been a presenter/exhibitor at several Looking at Student/Teacher Thinking exhibitions in Washington and... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
D220 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Can "Itty Bittys" Really Get the "Nitty Gritty"

How can early childhood educators incorporate thinking routines into the daily activities of three, four and five year olds?  Participants will leave having a better understanding of a variety of thinking routines, presented by an early childhood classroom teacher and the Head of Early Childhood at Presbyterian Day School. The presenters will provide ways to modify curriculum to enhance understanding, as well as ways to engage the student as an active participant in expanding his/her learning as the hub of the educational process. Participants will explore activities that contribute to the creation of a culture of thinking in the early childhood classroom.

Intended Audience:  Pre-Kindergarten through 2nd grade teaches and administrators


Speakers
avatar for Holly Lindsey

Holly Lindsey

Senior Kindergarten Teacher, Presbyterian Day School
Holly Lindsey has a Master’s degree in Early Childhood Education from the University of Memphis in Memphis, TN and a Bachelor’s degree in Infant and Child Development from Delta State University in Cleveland, MS. She has worked at Presbyterian Day School in Memphis, TN for the... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
EC1127 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Connecting Museum and Classroom: Art and Poetry
How can the use of art and museum visits change and deepen student learning?  In what ways might purposeful artful thinking routines enrich student expression in the language arts classroom? While exploring Project Zero ideas, the presenter, a middle school teacher, found new ways to bring artful thinking into the classroom. She hoped to see what would happen if students took time in a museum to look deeply at a work of art before writing. Working with an educator at the National Gallery of Art, Rebecca developed a structured thinking routine that allowed her to explore what happened to both teacher and student thinking along the way.

Intended Audience: General 

Speakers

Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
D209 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Creating Safe Reflective Classrooms for High Student Engagement and Rigor

This course—led by the associate program director for urban education of Facing History and Ourselves—will feature a multi-media, hands on and interactive approach. Participants will deepen their understanding of the key elements of a safe reflective classroom, elements essential to building a culture where critical thinking is not only encouraged, but expected of all students. This  is especially important when covering potentially emotionally sensitive content with students.  The session will model effective strategies for equipping students to take ownership of the learning environment so that students find their voice and agency. Students take this sense of responsibility and ownership with them throughout their educational experiences and even outside the classroom. Participants will leave not only with proven strategies but a greater sense of efficacy in regards to fostering a higher degree of student engagement, leading to a more rigorous learning environment.

Intended Audience:  6th-12th grade LA, SS, Humanities, ELA


Speakers
SB

Steven Becton

Facing History and Ourselves


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
D210 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Developing a Sensitivity to the Design of Systems: Fostering Global Competencies in an Interconnected World

During this course, Project Zero researchers from the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative will partner with practitioners from schools in Oakland, CA, to facilitate a an exploration of why it’s critical for young people to think like makers/designers and how to develop the kinds of skills and capacities required to do this work. Participants will engage in hands-on activities designed in particular to examine systems thinking, including visual mapping exercises, user perspective-taking, and the noticing of dynamics of whole systems and object relationships within systems. Facilitators will also contextualize the work within contemporary cultural movements (e.g., a shift from a consumer to producer mentality) and discuss the role that curriculum and learning environments can play in supporting maker/design thinking. For the past two years, the AbD team has been exploring the intersection of the maker movement, design thinking and contemporary theories of learning. At the core of AbD’s work is the idea that cultivating a sensitivity to the made dimension of objects, ideas, and systems can help young people better position themselves to thrive in a global, complex and designed world.

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Edward Clapp

Edward Clapp

Senior Research Manager, Project Zero
Edward P. Clapp is a senior research manager and a member of the core research team working on the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative—an investigation of the promises, practices, and pedagogies of maker-centered learning—at Project Zero, an educational research center at the Harvard... Read More →
JE

Jenny Ernst

Park Day School, Park Day School
Teaching math and science with 6th graders at a progressive school has been a dream career. At this independent school in Oakland, my values around social justice have been cultivated through professional development to deeply understand my students and the world we live in. My latest... Read More →
JR

Jen Ryan

Researcher, Project Manager, Project Zero
avatar for Brooke Toczyloweski

Brooke Toczyloweski

Art and Technology Teacher, Oakland International High School


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
D225 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Developing Global Competencies in the World Language Classroom Through Personal Relevance

There is a clear need to adapt current instructional approaches in order to better prepare the next generation of students for the changing world and for shifting social and economic demands. As educators, we need to help students become strategic and deliberate learners within a globalized context wherein the prefix “multi-” has become so important. How then do we engage our students in our content areas in such a way that also prepares them for intellectual and civic interaction with a much larger audience – the globe? As global language instructors in this era, the presenters of this course recognize that their teaching and learning goals must cultivate skills and knowledge that extend beyond linguistic competency. Their goals also must include cultural competency, critical thinking skills, application opportunities and relevant learning experiences. Participants will join in a discussion of the challenges of and opportunities for engaging students in learning for the present and the future. Using three pedagogical guides—thinking routines, the Teaching for Understanding framework, and Fink’s Taxonomy—participants will experience the process of creating projects applicable in their own contexts that reflect these objectives for the 21st century learner.

Intended Audience:  Secondary & Post-Secondary World Language Instructors


Speakers
JL

Julie Luebbers

Thomas More College
avatar for Amye Sukapdjo

Amye Sukapdjo

Assistant Professor of French, The University of North Georgia (US)
My research interests include biliteracy and bilingualism development, the use of technology in the foreign language classroom, and of course French culture and civilization, including France's culinary history.


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
EC1109 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Disturbance: Engaging Students through Ideas of Wide Scope

This interactive course will invite participants to examine an “idea of wide scope”(D. Perkins) as they explore the role disturbance could play in changing educational practices in ways that are responsive to 21st Century learning environments, whether those practices are at the level of policy creation, administrative decision making, classroom interaction, or digital contexts.  We will examine ideas about disturbance from several viewpoints, using Thinking Routines.  Examples of current dilemmas found in educational contexts will be used to prompt discussion.  Throughout the session, participants will be encouraged to reflect on their own ideas and practices so as to highlight areas of change they can enact in their own settings.

Intended Audience:  General


Speakers
avatar for Janet Navarro

Janet Navarro

Professor, Grand Valley State University
Equity Open-mindedness Kindness Joy My Family Summer at the Lake
RR

Rod Rock

Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
D102 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Engaging Adolescents in the Secondary Classroom

This course will provide an opportunity for participants to see first-hand how to make thinking visible in the secondary school classroom and  how to implement various thinking routines and protocols. The presenters will demonstrate how they accomplished integration of the Cultures of Thinking philosophy in their classroom by creating a collaborative learning environment that promotes student achievement, connects curriculum to the individual learner, increases student and teacher engagement, and provides opportunity for collaboration and documentation of student growth.

Intended Audience:  Secondary Teachers and Administrators


Speakers
AH

Amy Hohlbein

Spanish Teacher, Clarkton High School


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
EC1106 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Making Thinking Visible Through a Whole New Game

How do we make students’ thinking visible? Inspired by John Hunter’s World Peace Game, two second grade teachers at Presbyterian Day School created Zoolandia as a way to engage learners with the core idea of setting up conflict between four groups.  Students assume roles in designing and operating a zoo to simulate real world situations, deal with biological and environmental crises, and engage in a game that requires learners to think in the discipline of biology. Learning thrives in this example of David Perkins’ concept of playing the junior version  of the whole game as students solve meaningful challenges. In this course participants will learn how to adapt the core idea of making thinking visible through game play to their discipline or content area. They will have an opportunity to design and begin to create their own game around the essential understandings and throughlines they have for their students.

Intended Audience:  K-12


Speakers
avatar for Beth Diaz

Beth Diaz

2ND GRADE TEACHER, PRESBYTERIAN DAY SCHOOL
Previously serving as a reading specialist, a teacher of gifted students, and a middle school teacher, Beth Diaz has spent many years at Presbyterian Day School as a teacher in first and second grades. Along with her students, Beth is interested in writing and blogging. Using the... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Ann Taylor

Stephanie Ann Taylor

Teacher, Presbyterian Day School
I teach a classroom full of 2nd grade boys at Presbyterian Day School. In my classroom I enjoy finding ways to allow my students to learn for themselves, and creating an environment where students are led by what they want to know and understand. I am a third year teacher with a Bachelors... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
1404B Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Nurturing Global Competence Through the Use of Global Thinking Routines
The challenge is clear: The most pressing problems of our time—from climate change to mass migration, human rights to equitable economic development—demand global cooperation. They demand that we educate our youth to investigate topics of global significance, to collaborate across cultures, to communicate across difference and to take informed action. How can we transform our classrooms into spaces where students engage with the world beyond their immediate environment? For years, researchers at Project Zero have examined the role of Thinking Routines in the promotion of a culture of thinking and thinking dispositions. In this course, Project Zero researcher Veronica Boix Mansilla will explore a novel approach to Thinking Routines—Global Thinking Routines—specifically designed to advance students’ global competence. Through a combination of brief presentations and small group collaboration/discussion, participants will develop their understanding of what global competence is and why it matters today. They will examine the role of Thinking Routines in creating a globally-minded classroom culture and advancing student global competence. Through interactive exploration of various Global Thinking Routines, participants will develop the capacity to use these routines in their own classrooms.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Boix Mansilla

Veronica Boix Mansilla

Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Veronica Boix Mansilla is a principal investigator and Steering Committee member at Project Zero, HGSE, where she leads the IdGlobal Project and chairs the Future of Learning Institute. With a background in cognitive science, human development and education, she examines how to prepare... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Rivard

Melissa Rivard

Sr. Project Manager, Center on the Developing Child
Melissa Rivard is Senior Project Manager on the Frontiers of Innovation (FOI) initiative, supporting the Center’s strategy for creating and testing new innovations. She is the project lead for Innovation Clusters in Washington State and the UK, as well as many projects in the FOI... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
E105 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Portledge School: A Story of Transformation

How does change happen and take hold in a school setting? In this course, explore the way two noted change agents have used frameworks and big ideas to powerful effect in a number of settings. Using practices inspired by Project Zero and the preschools of Reggio Emilia, Italy, principal Alan Cohen has led pubic and private schools to make transformational shifts. Best-selling author and co-founder of the Tribeca Film Festival, Craig Hatkoff has worked with the Disruptive Innovation Theory to challenge traditional models of schooling. In this course, participants will experience thinking routines and protocols as  the course delves into the major theme of the conference, How and Where Does Learning Thrive?

Intended Audience:  Administrators and Teachers


Speakers
avatar for Alan D. Cohen

Alan D. Cohen

Lower School Head, Portledge School
Alan is a seasoned administrator having filled many roles: teacher and administrator for the New York City Department of Education, Network Leader providing support and supervision for principals in 32 New York City schools, principal of P.S. 69 in the Bronx, and for the past three... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
D112 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Thinking Lab: One Science Teacher, One Art Teacher … An Experiment in Collaboration and Creativity

In this course, the presenters will share their experience in creating an interdisciplinary classroom called the Thinking Lab at the Environmental Charter School in Pittsburgh, PA, for K-3 students. By facilitating an experience where students work with an art teacher and science teacher to explore, create, build and communicate, students are able to establish meaningful connections between the disciplines of science, art and design. Over the past year and a half, the practices of the educators in the Thinking Lab have evolved from basic integration to using a maker mentality and design thinking to help children solve complex problems and communicate through art making. While the Thinking Lab is an iterative and evolving classroom, we see through the assessment of thinking a great deal of power in incorporating artmaking into science content instruction. Participants will be able to practice several human-centered design methods that they can take back to their classrooms/schools. Together we will go through a series of design methods and thinking routines similar to those that we use both with children and faculty to explore the question,"How might we foster creativity in the elementary school setting?"

Intended Audience:  K-5 Educators and Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Shannon Merenstein

Shannon Merenstein

Thinking Lab Educator/ Design Coach, Environmental Charter School


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
EC1128 Presbyterian Day School

11:00am PST

Visible Thinking as a Tool for Creating a Community of Thinkers in a School – Students, Teachers, Administrators and Parents

In this course, led by an original member of the Visible Thinking project in Sweden, participants will experience how to build a culture of thinking in the entire school community—students, teachers, administrators and parents—and  how to sustain it when ”core” leaders leave. We will focus on the importance of inviting teachers and parents into the process to make thinking visible in the classrooms. Participants will be introduced to a number of thinking routines, which can be used in different settings, subjects and social situations—for example, with students, with teachers at faculty meetings and with parents at evening meetings. Participants also will have the opportunity to collaboratively develop their thinking  about how to start and/or deepen the work with Visbile Thinking at their schools.

Intended Audience:  Teachers in all grades and subjects, school leaders


Speakers
LN

Lotta Norell

Educator, NUKAB
Lotta Norell has been a teacher for many, many years. Now she is educating teachers, mostly in Sweden, about Visible Thinking. Lotta was the coordinator for the project” Making Thinking Visible” at Lemshaga Academy, Sweden 2000-2005. That was the beginning of Visible Thinking. Lotta... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 11:00am - 1:00pm PST
D206 Presbyterian Day School

12:00pm PST

Strand A Lunch
Friday February 14, 2014 12:00pm - 1:00pm PST
Gymnasium Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Strand B Lunch
Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 2:00pm PST
Gymnasium Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

(In Spanish) It’s Not Just for the Students! Using Thinking Routines and Making Learning Visible to Cultivate a Community of Reflective Teacher Practitioners and Community Stakeholders

Participants in this course will learn how several thinking routines and the documentation process are being implemented in a Pre-K3 – 8th grade, dual language urban school. The course presenters, the school’s principal and an instructional coach, will invite participants to participate in activities that been used to cultivate a professional learning community within a diverse, multi-cultural and multilingual staff. They regularly engage with protocols to examine student work, analyze student thinking, and have meaningful conversations about student learning with its stakeholders. This session will be in Spanish

Intended Audience:  Teachers K-12, ESL and resource teachers, school administrators, parents and leaders


Speakers
avatar for Arturo Mola

Arturo Mola

Principal, Sacred Heart Academy
avatar for Jodi Bossio Smith

Jodi Bossio Smith

ELL Coordinator, DC Bilingual Public Charter School
Jodi Bossio has been working as an educator for over 12 years in urban settings and has taught students in first grade through postgraduate education.  She has a Master’s degree in education and is highly qualified in both English as a Second Language and English Teaching, with... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D202 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Andrew Goldsworthy-Inspired Nature Sculptures

Get your students engaged by getting them outdoors! Learn how nature sculptures can deepen understanding of scientific and artistic concepts. In this course, participants will examine a multidisciplinary nature-art project that can be easily adapted for grade levels and subject areas. Learn how to get students engaged in “maker-thinking,” creativity, digital documentation and reflection. Participants in this session will see how an upper elementary classroom teacher and elementary art teacher teamed up to get students thinking and creating artistically in the outdoors. They’ll see how, after studying the work of Andy Goldsworthy, students found ways to use natural materials to build their own sculptures outside. The unit involves integration of technology through the use of photo documentation and reflective writing in blogs and online discussions. Understanding is deepened through use of thinking routines at every stage of the process. Participants will build their own nature sculptures with materials provided. The simulation offers first-hand experience of what the students do, and surfaces questions and concepts that can be explored deeply with an ongoing study of this sort, through various seasons of the year.

Intended Audience: General and Elementary Teachers 


Speakers
avatar for Connie Weber

Connie Weber

Educator, Teacher Leader, Emerson School
Passionate about: bringing learning alive through creative and exploratory curricula, global connections, outdoor education, interweaving of art and academics, ongoing awareness and study of metacognition and neuroscience in class, multi-generational learning (students with elders... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D207 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Artful Thinking in the Classroom

How might classroom teachers integrate art into their curriculum to support rigorous thinking, encourage creativity and deepen engagement with content?  In this course, presented by two educators from the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, participants will practice using Project Zero thinking routines and learn a framework for facilitating conversations around works of art, providing an entry point for deeper inquiry of subject matter. Thinking routines (a key component many Project Zero initiatives) are flexible, easy-to-learn strategies that support and promote rich thinking and thoughtful learning across school subjects and various grade levels. We will examine the ways thinking routines paired with works of art can encourage the dispositions to slow down, thoughtfully observe, reason, wonder, and uncover complex layers of meaning through individual reflection and group discussion. This course will conclude with time to reflect on the ways thinking routines and arts integration connect to Common Core Standards.

Intended Audience:  General


Speakers
avatar for Nathalie Ryan

Nathalie Ryan

CAC Plenary Speaker/Course Leader, National Gallery of Art
Nathalie Ryan is a Senior Educator at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, where she has led programs for families, teens, and adults since 2002. She is mini-course instructor and study group leader at Project Zero Classroom, coaches the PZ-HGSE Visible Thinking online course... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
EC1104 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Building a Culture of Thinking: Routines, Structures, Strategies, and “Stick-to-itiveness”

This interactive session will engage participants directly in the processes, procedures and routines that make up a culture of thinking. Through the lenses of leaders, students, teachers and parents, participants will collectively contemplate how developing a culture of thinking fosters global competence and 21st century thinking skills. Participants will delve directly into thinking routines, view videos and artifacts from the Cultures of Thinking project in Michigan (US), make inferences and direct connections to their work, and examine resources that take thinking to a deeper level.

Intended Audience:  General


Speakers
avatar for Mahoney, Nancy

Mahoney, Nancy

Principal, Springfield Plains Elementary School
RR

Rod Rock

Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D102 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Connecting Student Learning, Thinking Routines and Formative Assessment
This course, led by a middle school principal, will provide hands-on opportunities to see visible thinking used in conjunction with formative assessment practices. Participants will engage in a variety of learning experiences to begin their own thinking about the journey of learning in the classroom. We will use thinking routines and a protocol to see how the process of formative assessment can be used not only to make student thinking visible, but to guide instruction on a daily basis. Together, we will look at teacher and student evidence to understand ways to build a culture of thinking in the classroom.

Intended Audience:  General

 

Speakers
TC

Tina Chambers

Principal, Brandon Middle School


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
EC1103 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Creating a Culture of Learning: Thinking Routines to Establish Agreements & Expectations

The beginning of the school year is a crucial time for establishing expectations and routines for students and teachers. In order for the students to take ownership of their learning, they need to begin conversations about learning and have a metacognitive awareness about how that learning should look. They also need to develop effective communication skills and have many shared experiences in working together, in both small and large groups. Building a culture of thinking and learning helps to develop intrinsic motivation and encourages thoughtful approaches to topics throughout the year. The presenters, elementary school teachers, will share their experience in using thinking routines to create classroom agreements at the start of the year. Participants will explore ways to use these ideas in their classroom as well.

Intended Audience:  Classroom teachers grades 3-6


Speakers
LL

Leslie Lemma

5th Grade Teacher, Portledge School
SM

Sara McInerney

5th Grade Teacher, Portledge School


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D108 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Creating a Thinking Classroom: Using Thinking Routines to Motivate and Engage

What does it really mean to “think?” How can we create a culture of thinking in our classroom to motivate students to see themselves as thinkers? In this session, participants will examine the ways in which learners seek to understand and engage in several thinking routines that provide pathways for students to expand their thinking skills. The presenters, both teachers in an integrated arts school, will share their experience in using thinking routines to create a student-centered environment where thinking and questioning drive the learning process. As participants engage in learning through these routines, they will reflect on how creating a classroom where thinking is valued can help us engage students who are difficult to reach and build confidence in at-risk learners.

Intended Audience:  General



Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D213 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Developing a Culture of Thinking with Beginning Teachers

What are some initial steps that we can take to deepen engagement and create a culture of thinking in our classrooms? This session, designed for educators who work with beginning teachers, will address the first conference theme, how to create a culture of thinking, from the lens of teacher educators. In 2012, in an effort to strengthen their program, the presenters changed their student teaching seminar to include small cohorts led by nationally certified Critical Friends Group facilitators. In these cohorts, students experience several thinking routines that they can then add to their repertoire of pedagogical tools as they enter the classroom. They also adopted Making Thinking Visible: How to Promote Engagement, Understanding, and Independence for All Learners as the core text for the seminar, so that students could learn about the ways that experienced teachers are using these thinking routines in their current practice. The current seminar engages students in a cycle of learning that involves experiencing a thinking routine and reading about how it can be used in practice, reflecting on that routine, integrating it into their own lesson and curriculum plans, and then sharing what they noticed with their faculty supervisors and peers. Then, for the capstone demonstration, pre-service teachers describe their own students’ responses to the thinking routines and reflect on what their students are learning. Participants in this workshop will engage in thinking routines and will look closely at artifacts from a beginning teacher’s practice. They will learn how to use these thinking routines in their own teaching or how to support colleagues in using them.

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Janet Chance

Janet Chance

Director, Office of School & Community Collaborations, School of Education


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D201 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Developing a Sensitivity to Design: How Making and Design Experiences Can Activate Student Agency

Since the first Maker Faire was held in San Mateo, California, in 2006, the “maker movement”—the social embodiment of the contemporary DIY cultural resurgence—has generated international enthusiasm in the act of making. While hacker spaces, fablabs and 3-D printers have gripped the attention of adult makers, so too have they generated interest amongst teachers, parents and educational policymakers. But what does it mean to bring “maker” into education? What are the thinking and learning opportunities present during a maker experience? During this course, Project Zero researchers from the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative will partner with educators from Oakland, CA, representing the action research strand of their work. Participants will engage in a series of hands-on activities to explore some of the benefits of making and design in education, including a “tinkering” activity designed to encourage close and critical looking at objects. The course will focus on two central questions: 1) How might maker learning experiences foster a sensitivity to the designed dimension of our world? 2) What role does having a sensitivity to design play in how young people engage with their world? Links will be made between participants’ experiences in this session and the potential for cultivating the agency—and design sensitivities—of young people in a variety of educational settings.

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Edward Clapp

Edward Clapp

Senior Research Manager, Project Zero
Edward P. Clapp is a senior research manager and a member of the core research team working on the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative—an investigation of the promises, practices, and pedagogies of maker-centered learning—at Project Zero, an educational research center at the Harvard... Read More →
JE

Jenny Ernst

Park Day School, Park Day School
Teaching math and science with 6th graders at a progressive school has been a dream career. At this independent school in Oakland, my values around social justice have been cultivated through professional development to deeply understand my students and the world we live in. My latest... Read More →
JR

Jen Ryan

Researcher, Project Manager, Project Zero
avatar for Brooke Toczyloweski

Brooke Toczyloweski

Art and Technology Teacher, Oakland International High School


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D225 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Developing Thinking, Understanding, and Reflecting Through Art and Literature

Learning thrives when students’ thinking is made visible and when there is time for student collaboration. This interactive presentation will give participants the opportunity to experience and learn about how using thinking routines with art and literature can enhance students’ thinking, understanding and reflection in an elementary classroom setting. Viewing documentation of student learning as they use these routines will give participants a sense of the way these students progressed in their understanding of the theme "Risks and Consequences" and in the process gained an understanding of their own and others' perspectives, while developing respect and empathy for others.

Intended Audience:  Elementary Teachers


Speakers
avatar for Tabbatha O'Donnell

Tabbatha O'Donnell

Upper Elementary Division Lead, Meyer Academy
Tabbatha O’Donnell is an elementary teacher with over 20 years of experience in grades K-5. She began her teaching career in Hawaii where she immersed in Hawaii’s multicultural environment, leading to a unique approach and sensitivity to teaching with a global perspective. Currently... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D200 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Going Beyond Comprehension: Artful Thinking and the Common Core

Common Core standards in English/Language Arts call upon teachers to move children beyond the mere comprehension of text, towards a deeper engagement suggesting that students interact with text using critical, evidence-based thinking from multiple points of view. This interactive session will first engage participants in a Visible Thinking experience highlighting two thinking routines that can be used to enter text in ways that are compatible with what is being asked for in the Common Core.  A transcribed example of students using the same thinking routine as well as their written work will be examined and compared to language taken from the Common Core ELA Standards. The course, based on work done in a fourth grade classroom, will be presented by a university-level English/Language Arts elementary education faculty member and an experienced practitioner of Project Zero ideas.

Intended Audience:  Elementary Language Arts and Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Janet Navarro

Janet Navarro

Professor, Grand Valley State University
Equity Open-mindedness Kindness Joy My Family Summer at the Lake


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D101 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

I Can Do PBL, Too!: How Project-Based Learning and Thinking Routines Can Thrive in Any Classroom

This course will explore the idea that learning can thrive in the urban school environment by making content meaningful and contextualized for students. In combining principles of Project-Based Learning and Project Zero thinking routines, a team of inner-city teachers will demonstrate ways they have developed and implemented Project-Based Learning lessons. They have found that when students are taught in this way, they are much more likely to become lovers of learning. Participants in this session will have a hands-on experience with a mini-PBL unit, and leave understanding how to implement it in their classroom.

Intended Audience:  Any teacher looking for ways to make learning student-based, exciting, and meaningful, especially teachers who feel dominated by teaching to the “test” and relying on student data. Presenters will focus on teaching in a public and charter school setting.



Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D208 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Making the Invisible Visible: Thinking Strategies that Promote Understanding

This session, led by two elementary school teachers, will aim to be a time of modeling, practicing, reflecting and empowering. It will address ways thinking routines can promote greater understanding for both students and teachers as well as techniques that the presenters have used to document the thinking and learning process. After engaging with a broad use of thinking routines across subject areas and grade levels, participants will examine various collaborative experiences that can help build a culture of thinking and learning in a classroom, and ultimately a school. The bulk of the session will be devoted to viewing and discussing video footage of thinking routines in practice in classrooms and to developing ways to use several thinking routines effectively.

Intended Audience:  K-5 teachers and administrators


Speakers
avatar for Heather Fisher

Heather Fisher

Master Teacher, Shelby County Schools
I have been teaching 17 years. I have a doctorate in Educational Leadership. I worked two years as President, Shelby County Education Association. I am currently a Master Teacher at Dogwood Elementary School. Since attending Project Zero at Harvard in 2012, I am passionate about incorporating... Read More →
avatar for Karen Vogelsang, NBCT

Karen Vogelsang, NBCT

3rd Grade Teacher, Shelby County Schools - Winridge Elementary
I am a second career teacher and I have been teaching for fourteen years. I have a Bachelors Degree in Business Administration and a Masters Degree in Elementary Education. I served as Tennessee's 2015 Tennessee Teacher of the Year. I currently serve as Hope Street Group Fellow... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D226 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Making Thinking Audible: Music and You as the Maker

In this course, participants will be asked to leave their assumptions at the door about their own ability to make music. Together we will create musical moments, short improvisational pieces and a group composition. We will experience thinking routines in in the context of listening carefully to song, exploring elements of sound/silence, and examining performances of each group's short composition. The presenter, an experienced musician and middle school music teacher, will invite participants to reconsider their thoughts about what they value and what convention directs them to disregard in listening to and creating music, with the hope widening the inner ear and listening beyond unreflective, inherited barriers of reaction.   

Intended Audience:  General and musicians


Speakers
avatar for Kit Young

Kit Young

Consultant & Writer
Kit Young returned in 2012 to Washington, D.C., from 20 years living in Thailand, Malaysia, Myanmar and China, where she pursued a career as a pianist, composer and organizer of concerts and festivals. She has lectured extensively about Burmese, Thai, traditional and contemporary... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D117 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Making Your Mark: Using Visible Thinking to Promote Creative and Collaborative Thinking

This course will explore ways to encourage collaborative and creative thinking in children (and adults) by making their thinking and learning visible using thinking routines. Participants will leave the course with examples and strategies for how to encourage creativity and habits of mind relevant to all disciplines, and how to make thinking and learning visible to support effective collaboration. The presenters, part of an arts interdisciplinary team at the elementary school level, will demonstrate how the creative process can be collaborative, and the dispositions and habits of mind it develops. They will describe not only how these processes encourage creativity and act as a force for student learning, but also how the routines provide documentation of the creative process, making it explicit. Participants will engage in this process and create a digital composition together using thinking routines to structure, support and reflect on the process.

Intended Audience:  General, (Presenters work with Pre-K-2nd grade students in the fine arts and with technology, and provide professional development for adults, but will share concepts applicable to all educators)


Speakers
avatar for Alison Keller

Alison Keller

Technology Facilitator, Glenview School District 34
I am a Technology Facilitator at a primary school in Glenview, IL. In this position, I work with kids and teachers to support their use of technology in the classroom. We are currently moving toward a 1:1 iPad environment for the entire district (K-8). I also work closely with... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
EC1126 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Mu-SEE-uM: Community, Collections, Connections

This course will highlight the elements that contribute to a successful school and museum partnership involving students in preschool to third grade and six cultural, art, and historical museum partners. The presenters—a museum-based educator and a school-based museum partnership coordinator—will examine how actively using the frameworks of Teaching for Understanding, Making Thinking Visible, and Habits of Mind added a level of depth to a specific partnership that enabled kindergarten students to stretch their thinking about museums, colors, shapes and lines as they worked very closely with a local art museum and visiting artists. Participants will experience, as students have done, thinking routines to engage with visual art and object-based inquiry. This museum partnership program remains an evolving alliance as it continues bridging the visible thinking approach with museum-based learning strategies and developmentally appropriate classroom practices. The presenters will share how faculty created purposeful learning conditions to cultivate a culture in which thinking skills become more intuitive for these young children. It is replicable and can be tailored to meet specific curricular objectives and goals.

Intended Audience:  General, All Grade Levels from Elementary to High School, Administrators, Museum Educators


Speakers
avatar for Rochelle Ibañez Wolberg

Rochelle Ibañez Wolberg

Learning Specialist/Coordinator of Support Services, Palm Beach Day Academy
I am passionate about exploring new ways for supporting my students' capacity for compassion, sensitivity, mindfulness, lifelong learning, sense of wonder and discovery, and confidence in who they are as individuals. I'm also passionate about my family, walking off the beaten path... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D215 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Next Steps After a Project Zero Experience: Helping Learning Thrive Upon the Return to School

How might school leaders effectively support teachers in their school as those teachers return from a Project Zero institute or conference? The presenter, a Presbyterian Day School administrator, will share specific examples of systems of support used at PDS to help teachers as they begin to design and facilitate learning based on Project Zero methods and strategies. With the goal of creating a culture of thinking for all of the learners in their school, participants will experience routines and protocols useful in exploring these ideas further and begin to articulate a vision for their school and develop a plan for moving forward.

Intended Audience:  K-12 School leadership – administrators, curriculum leaders, teacher leaders, or anyone who supports professional development of teachers or is interested in facilitating change in a school.


Speakers
avatar for Susan Droke

Susan Droke

Assistant Head for Teaching and Learning, Presbyterian Day School
Susan Droke currently serves as Assistant Headmaster for Teaching and Learning at Presbyterian Day School (PDS), an independent boys’ school in Memphis, TN. During her teaching career in both public and independent schools, Susan has filled the roles of classroom teacher, as well... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
1404A Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Out of Eden Learn: Where “Slow Learning” Meets Social Media

In the frenzied pace of school life, students (and teachers) rarely have time to consider big questions about themselves and humanity as a whole. How do our lives relate to place? How are we connected to other human beings? How do we as individuals fit into a bigger story of human history?  Where as a species are we collectively headed? In this course, the presenters, both Project Zero researchers on the Out of Eden Learn project, will draw from Project Zero’s collaboration with prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek, whose seven-year Out of Eden Walk involves retracing the migratory pathways of our ancient human ancestors and generating “slow journalism”. Participants will engage in a variety of activities that encourage students both to learn from the stories and perspectives of others as well as to reflect in new ways about themselves and the wider world. While we will introduce participants to our free, online learning community for middle and high school students, our activities will also be applicable to “off-line” classroom contexts. The course is open to all but may be of particular interest to history, geography and social studies educators.

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Principal Investigator, Project Zero
I've been playing a leading role with Out of Eden Learn, Project Zero's new online learning community to accompany journalist Paul Salopek's epic walk around the world. I'm a former history teacher and I'm particularly interested in making history and social studies more personally... Read More →
avatar for Carrie James

Carrie James

Principal Investigator, Harvard Project Zero
Carrie James is a Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Project Zero, and a Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research explores young people’s digital, moral, and civic lives.


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
E111 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Putting Young Learners On The Path To Understanding

The better children understand the world, the more effectively they will be able to participate in and engage with it. Our children are likely to work and live in communities that are rapidly changing and more diverse, and will be called upon to interact with people who observe different norms and have different points of view. They will need mental agility to interact successfully in new and unique situations. This is why in the 21st century, educating for understanding and developing the critical thinking skills to achieve it are more important than ever. What does it mean to teach for understanding? How will this approach better equip students for life in the 21st century? How can deeper understanding best be developed in an elementary school classroom? What role do thinking routines play in this process? What will understanding look like once it is achieved? These are some of the questions that will be considered in this course, as the presenter, an elementary school teacher, shares how the Teaching For Understanding framework and Cultures of Thinking principles brought about an important shift in her approach to teaching, stimulated critical thinking and inquiry in her classroom, and ultimately resulted in a deeper understanding of topics studied.

Intended Audience:  The presentation is directed at a general audience but the examples will be from elementary school and so might be better appreciated by an elementary school audience.


Speakers

Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
EC1130 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Take a Leap Off the Edge: Merging the Principles of Harvard's Project Zero with Design Thinking

How does folding the edges of Design Thinking with the principles of Visible Thinking approaches create classrooms of understanding? How does this process equip today's learners to become the future problems solvers of tomorrow? In this workshop, we will share hands-on learning experiences that are living parts of our curriculum, not simply add-on lessons. Participants will have an opportunity to experience the four-step process of design thinking through the eyes and hands of a student. They will begin to create their own design thinking challenge(s) by collaborating with the team.

Intended Audience:  K-12


Speakers
avatar for Alice Parker

Alice Parker

Director of Tutoring & Enrichment Center and Learning Specialist, Presbyterian Day School
As a teacher, tutor and curriculum designer for over 27 years, Alice Maund Parker has expertise working with students ranging from those with learning disabilities to those who are academically gifted. She received her bachelors degree in elementary and special education from the... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Ann Taylor

Stephanie Ann Taylor

Teacher, Presbyterian Day School
I teach a classroom full of 2nd grade boys at Presbyterian Day School. In my classroom I enjoy finding ways to allow my students to learn for themselves, and creating an environment where students are led by what they want to know and understand. I am a third year teacher with a Bachelors... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
EC1107 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

The Thinking Body: How Does Movement Inform the Mind?

This course, led by an accomplished choreographer and dancer, will explore active learning through the lens of dance/movement. We will discuss current research in cognitive neuroscience and then explore the creative process in a simple exercise in choreography. The composition (designed for any skill level of participant) will be used to look at creative practice and the  dispositions that are embedded within the process. We will refer to Multiple Intelligences and Teaching for Understanding throughout the course and make connections to academic curriculum to make explict the way artful thinking is valuable across all aspects of education.

Intended Audience:  General 


Speakers

Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
Dunavant Fitness Center Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Turning Experience into Expertise: Collaborative Inquiry as Professional Development

The most powerful sources of information about the quality of teaching and learning in a school are the student and teacher work that occurs in classrooms, day in and day out. Collaborative inquiry groups provide educators with the opportunity to examine closely their own practice as well as the work of their students, defining essential questions about their work and pursuing those questions collaboratively and systematically with colleagues over time. In this interactive course, we’ll discuss benefits and challenges of collaborative inquiry groups, paying particular attention to the critical process of generating and refining powerful questions that guide collaborative inquiry. The presenter, an expert at facilitating collaborative inquiry groups, will have the group engage with various models of effective approaches.

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers

Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
Hussey Commons Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

UNCOMMON IT Integration for the COMMON CORE

The presenters—educators at a public elementary school in Michigan—will explore with participants the way their students are learning how to participate respectfully in a global technological community and at the same time capture their academic thinking in a visible way. Participants will see demonstrations of how technology can make representations of thinking and learning visible and how it can increase learning. Having aligned their curriculum and assessments to the Common Core and embedded thinking routines into all classrooms, the presenters will show how they document and assess student and teacher learning in order to further their own learning. They also will share how teachers work collaboratively; how they collaborate with students to use data to drive instruction; how they work with the community to extend the culture of learning; and how they collaborate with families through digital home/school connection. Ultimately, these examples will show how the school is helping to make all of its stakeholders’ thinking and learning visible through multiple, effective and collaborative endeavors, in a variety of contexts.

Intended Audience:  Elementary K-6, Central Office, Elementary Principals



Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
EC1102 Presbyterian Day School

1:00pm PST

Uncommon Movements on the Stairs Project: Making The Ordinary Extraordinary in a Reggio-Inspired School

This interactive course will focus on the Stair Project, based on the journey of a Reggio Emilia-inspired pre-kindergarten class. As teachers observed their students’ fascination with the stairs, they became interested in exploring the children’s relationship with the stairs. Participants will learn about the project from start to finish and engage in a process similar to what the children followed—observing, interacting, listening and documenting one another’s thinking—as a way to gain a better understanding of the children’s thinking.

Intended Audience:  Early Childhood 


Speakers
KH

Katie Henry

Pre-K Teacher, Portledge School


Friday February 14, 2014 1:00pm - 3:00pm PST
D216 Presbyterian Day School

2:00pm PST

Strand B Talk -- Daniel Wilson: Making Learning (and Learners) Visible: Reggio Emilia-Inspired Practices From Pre-School to High School

In the coming decade the culture of many classrooms will be transformed by the need to develop skills such as collaboration and critical thinking in order for students to be effective participants in an increasingly globalized and complex world. Schools can no longer afford to be places where learning is simply a transmissive, cognitive activity carried out in isolation. Instead, educators will be challenged to shape new practices in which learners and their learning are made more visible to a variety of audiences. What does visible learning look like in a range of classroom contexts? This session will present key principles and practices from the Making Learning Visible (MLV) project – a 15-year exploration with leaders from Italy’s renowned Reggio Emilia preschools and infant toddler centers, which aimed to distill visible learning practices and extend them to a range of classroom contexts. Daniel Wilson will make a case for reinventing classrooms as contexts in which what is learned (and who learners are) becomes more visible to teachers, students and the wider community. He will outline four core principles of visible learning – learning as social, representational, empowering, and emotional – and provide rich stories (“visual essays”) of classrooms organized around them. Participants will learn how the combination of two key practices in visible classrooms, those of small group learning and documentation, provide a pathway for changing the culture of learning in classrooms.


Speakers
avatar for Daniel Wilson

Daniel Wilson

Director, Project Zero
Dr. Daniel Wilson is the Director of Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE). He is a Principal Investigator at Project Zero, a Lecturer at HGSE, Faculty for the Doctorate for Educational Leadership program at HGSE, and the Educational Chair at Harvard’s... Read More →


Friday February 14, 2014 2:00pm - 3:00pm PST
Fellowship Hall Second Presbyterian Church

3:15pm PST

Panel Discussion with Field Practitioners

Change in education is rarely smooth or easy. We have much to learn from educators who have helped to bring about true reform, either in a school system, a school building or classrooms. Three educational leaders from a variety of contexts will share their experiences with guiding and sustaining Project Zero ideas, David Perkins will introduce and frame the discussion around "Effecting School Change," and Project Zero Perspectives Education Chair Jim Reese will moderate. 


Moderators
avatar for Jim Reese

Jim Reese

Director, Professional Development Collaborative at Washington International School
Jim Reese is the founding Director of WISSIT and of the Professional Development Collaborative at Washington International School. He taught English at the secondary level for many years in U.S. public schools and in international schools in Belgium. A consultant with Project Zero... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Lee Burns

Lee Burns

Headmaster, Presbyterian Day School
Lee Burns serves as headmaster of Presbyterian Day School (PDS), an independent school serving approximately 640 boys in grades PK-6 in Memphis. He has served as headmaster since 2000. In the Fall of 2014, he will begin serving as Headmaster of McCallie School in Chattanooga. A... Read More →
LN

Lotta Norell

Educator, NUKAB
Lotta Norell has been a teacher for many, many years. Now she is educating teachers, mostly in Sweden, about Visible Thinking. Lotta was the coordinator for the project” Making Thinking Visible” at Lemshaga Academy, Sweden 2000-2005. That was the beginning of Visible Thinking. Lotta... Read More →
RR

Rod Rock

Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools


Friday February 14, 2014 3:15pm - 4:30pm PST
Fellowship Hall Second Presbyterian Church
 
Saturday, February 15
 

9:00am PST

Framing of Day
Speakers
avatar for Jim Reese

Jim Reese

Director, Professional Development Collaborative at Washington International School
Jim Reese is the founding Director of WISSIT and of the Professional Development Collaborative at Washington International School. He taught English at the secondary level for many years in U.S. public schools and in international schools in Belgium. A consultant with Project Zero... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:00am - 9:15am PST
Fellowship Hall Second Presbyterian Church

9:30am PST

(In English) It’s Not Just for the Students! Using Thinking Routines and Making Learning Visible to Cultivate a Community of Reflective Teacher Practitioners and Community Stakeholders

Participants in this course will learn how several thinking routines and the documentation process are being implemented in a Pre-K3 – 8th grade, dual language urban school. The course presenters, the school’s principal and an instructional coach, will invite participants to participate in activities that been used to cultivate a professional learning community within a diverse, multi-cultural and multilingual staff. They regularly engage with protocols to examine student work, analyze student thinking, and have meaningful conversations about student learning with its stakeholders. This session will be in English.

Intended Audience:  Teachers K-12, ESL and resource teachers, school administrators, parents and leaders


Speakers
avatar for Arturo Mola

Arturo Mola

Principal, Sacred Heart Academy
avatar for Jodi Bossio Smith

Jodi Bossio Smith

ELL Coordinator, DC Bilingual Public Charter School
Jodi Bossio has been working as an educator for over 12 years in urban settings and has taught students in first grade through postgraduate education.  She has a Master’s degree in education and is highly qualified in both English as a Second Language and English Teaching, with... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D202 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

A Journey of Reflection through a Routine

Teachers and administrators participating in this interactive course will take a journey with the presenters through their last school year and learn how a bi-weekly staff gathering to study the changes in teacher and student learning energized and transformed how the staff documented and assessed student growth across content areas. Throughout the course participants will be provided opportunities to engage in thinking routines and protocols as well as view them in action. The course presenters, the principal and an experienced teacher in the school, have been working directly with the Cultures of Thinking project in Oakland County, Michigan.

Intended Audience:  Elementary teachers and administrators


Speakers
KS

Karen Sinclair

4th grade Teacher, Pine Knob Elementary, Clarkston Community Schools
JY

Jodi Yeloushan

Principal, Pine Knob Elementary, Clarkston Community Schools


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D111 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

An Invitation to Imagination, Creativity, Innovation, and Collaboration – with Robots!

In this session, the presenters will share details of an interdisciplinary project inspired by the work in preschools of Reggio Emilia, Italy. Participants will examine interactions between students and teachers engaged in the process of documenting connections between science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics. Key principles of documentation will be presented, explained and discussed interactively.  Special attention will be given to how each of five strategies for promoting learning in groups was employed during the project. Throughout the session, participants will be invited to share their personal experiences, and relate them to the approaches presented.

Intended Audience:  General


Speakers
avatar for Ken Graham

Ken Graham

About Ken GrahamAssistant Superintendent, Hauppauge Public Schools, Hauppauge, NY Ken Graham has provided leadership in technology innovation for 25 years as Assistant Superintendent and Director of Educational Technology in several Long Island, New York school districts. He recently... Read More →
avatar for Evelina Sarles

Evelina Sarles

teacher, Portledge School
Evelina Sarles has taught science to children for 30 years. Portledge's recent paradigm shift to the Reggio Emilia philosophy and Project Zero has been exciting.


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D112 Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

Andrew Goldsworthy-Inspired Nature Sculptures

Get your students engaged by getting them outdoors! Learn how nature sculptures can deepen understanding of scientific and artistic concepts. In this course, participants will examine a multidisciplinary nature-art project that can be easily adapted for grade levels and subject areas. Learn how to get students engaged in “maker-thinking,” creativity, digital documentation and reflection. Participants in this session will see how an upper elementary classroom teacher and elementary art teacher teamed up to get students thinking and creating artistically in the outdoors. They’ll see how, after studying the work of Andy Goldsworthy, students found ways to use natural materials to build their own sculptures outside. The unit involves integration of technology through the use of photo documentation and reflective writing in blogs and online discussions. Understanding is deepened through use of thinking routines at every stage of the process. Participants will build their own nature sculptures with materials provided. The simulation offers first-hand experience of what the students do, and surfaces questions and concepts that can be explored deeply with an ongoing study of this sort, through various seasons of the year.

Intended Audience: General and Elementary Teachers 


Speakers
avatar for Connie Weber

Connie Weber

Educator, Teacher Leader, Emerson School
Passionate about: bringing learning alive through creative and exploratory curricula, global connections, outdoor education, interweaving of art and academics, ongoing awareness and study of metacognition and neuroscience in class, multi-generational learning (students with elders... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D207 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Artful Thinking in the Classroom

How might classroom teachers integrate art into their curriculum to support rigorous thinking, encourage creativity and deepen engagement with content?  In this course, presented by two educators from the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, participants will practice using Project Zero thinking routines and learn a framework for facilitating conversations around works of art, providing an entry point for deeper inquiry of subject matter. Thinking routines (a key component many Project Zero initiatives) are flexible, easy-to-learn strategies that support and promote rich thinking and thoughtful learning across school subjects and various grade levels. We will examine the ways thinking routines paired with works of art can encourage the dispositions to slow down, thoughtfully observe, reason, wonder, and uncover complex layers of meaning through individual reflection and group discussion. This course will conclude with time to reflect on the ways thinking routines and arts integration connect to Common Core Standards.

Intended Audience:  General


Speakers
avatar for Nathalie Ryan

Nathalie Ryan

CAC Plenary Speaker/Course Leader, National Gallery of Art
Nathalie Ryan is a Senior Educator at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, where she has led programs for families, teens, and adults since 2002. She is mini-course instructor and study group leader at Project Zero Classroom, coaches the PZ-HGSE Visible Thinking online course... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
EC1104 Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

Artful Thinking: Exploring the Power of Art to Strengthen Student Thinking and Learning

Artful Thinking, a program developed at Project Zero, uses the power of art to engage students in thinking-centered learning. The program is one of several school-based initiatives loosely linked by the theme of Making Thinking Visible. The specific goal of the Artful Thinking program is to help teachers regularly use works of visual art and music in their curriculum in ways that strengthen student thinking and deepen disciplinary learning.

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Jessica Ross

Jessica Ross

Researcher/Practioner, Project Zero
Jessica Ross is a senior practitioner specialist working at Project Zero on the Agency by Design Project.  Jessica was a founding team member of the Global Learning Charter Public School, where she taught grade 5-8 humanities for ten years.  A licensed principal, she has also served... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
Hussey Commons Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

Building a Culture of Thinking in a Mathematics Classroom

In this course, the presenters, both secondary math teachers in an international school with a demanding curriculum, will demonstrate five thinking routines that have proven to be particularly relevant in developing mathematical thinking: Claim-Support-Question, Get ICE, Connect-Extend-Challenge, I Used to Think…Now I Think, and See-Think-Wonder. Participants will develop their own lesson plans using one or more of the demonstrated thinking routines. Finally, the presenters will provide examples of how they use collaborative student learning as a means for promoting a culture of thinking in the classroom.

Intended Audience:  MS and US mathematics teachers


Speakers
IH

Ingrid Hamso

Upper School Mathematics Teacher and an Assistant Examiner for the IB Program, Washington International School
Ingrid Hamso is an upper school mathematics teacher at Washington International School and an assistant examiner for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program.She has been teaching mathematics at WIS for 13 years and mathematics and physics in Norwegian public schools for 11... Read More →
VM

Victoria Mizzi

Upper School Mathematics Teacher, Washington International School
Victoria Mizzi is an Upper School mathematics teacher at Washington International School. She previously taught high school math at a public school near Toronto, Ontario. Victoria first attended the Project Zero Classroom in the summer of 2013 and the experience has greatly influenced... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D107 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Building a Culture of Thinking That Fosters Lifelong Learning

What impact do you expect your children to make on the world, and the world on them, 25 years from now? The 21st century requires changing the stories of teaching and learning. It´s time to rethink education so that we can nurture passionate, critical and creative thinkers, globally competent and empathetic students who are curious, aware and interested in interpreting the world and learning how it works. But where do we start, especially with very young children, ages 1 to 5? During this interactive course we will explore how to build learning environments where thinking is valued, visible and actively promoted, and where cultural forces dance together to create the most powerful thinking and learning experiences. We will also focus on how to foster thinking and understating opportunities through the use of thinking routines and documentation as tools to help students become aware or their thinking moves and make them visible. 

Intended Audience:  This course is intended for early childhood teachers, elementary teachers, administrators, principals and faculty, and can be presented in English or Spanish.


Speakers
avatar for Silvia Lopez Angel, M.Ed.

Silvia Lopez Angel, M.Ed.

Founder/Principal, BaBidiBu Early Childhood Education


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D217 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Building a Culture of Thinking with Instructional Rounds

“For classrooms to be cultures of thinking for students, schools must be cultures of thinking for teachers.” --Ron Ritchhart

This quotation by Ritchhart from Intellectual Character informs the approach to professional development at the presenters’ school.  They strive to create opportunities for teachers to engage in deep and rich discussion about their practice, one avenue for this being Instructional Rounds: “A specific set of ideas about how practitioners work together to solve common problems and to improve their practice” (Elmore, 2010). Rounds involve a network of teachers coming together to explore a common problem of practice, conduct structured peer visits, and then reflect on the patterns noticed from peer visits and what this means for teachers’ own practice. This course will help guide participants through a variety of activities to learn what the rounds process is and how it is being used to foster a culture of thinking in school.

Intended Audience:  Secondary teachers and instructional coaches


Speakers
BD

Bill DeMartini

Instructional Coach/Social Studies Teacher, Tyee Middle School
I am passionate about learning, reflecting on my practice, and working to create opportunities for my students to be intellectually engaged with the content I teach. I am also passionate about finding new and meaningful ways to work with my colleagues in my role as instructional... Read More →
avatar for Janel Hershey

Janel Hershey

Instructional Coach/8th grade Physics Teacher, Bellevue School District
I am passionate about creating a culture of thinking among my students through the lense of physics. I am highly engaged in conversations about how I can help students understand physics deeply by rigourous purposeful thinking moves I make as a teacher. I am also excited to think... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D203 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Building a Culture of Thinking: Routines, Structures, Strategies, and “Stick-to-itiveness”

This interactive session will engage participants directly in the processes, procedures and routines that make up a culture of thinking. Through the lenses of leaders, students, teachers and parents, participants will collectively contemplate how developing a culture of thinking fosters global competence and 21st century thinking skills. Participants will delve directly into thinking routines, view videos and artifacts from the Cultures of Thinking project in Michigan (US), make inferences and direct connections to their work, and examine resources that take thinking to a deeper level.

Intended Audience: General


Speakers
avatar for Mahoney, Nancy

Mahoney, Nancy

Principal, Springfield Plains Elementary School
RR

Rod Rock

Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools
Superintendent, Clarkston Community Schools


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D102 Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

Creating Safe Reflective Classrooms for High Student Engagement and Rigor

This course—led by the associate program director for urban education of Facing History and Ourselves—will feature a multi-media, hands on and interactive approach. Participants will deepen their understanding of the key elements of a safe reflective classroom, elements essential to building a culture where critical thinking is not only encouraged, but expected of all students. This  is especially important when covering potentially emotionally sensitive content with students.  The session will model effective strategies for equipping students to take ownership of the learning environment so that students find their voice and agency. Students take this sense of responsibility and ownership with them throughout their educational experiences and even outside the classroom. Participants will leave not only with proven strategies but a greater sense of efficacy in regards to fostering a higher degree of student engagement, leading to a more rigorous learning environment.

Intended Audience:  6th-12th grade LA, SS, Humanities, ELA


Speakers
SB

Steven Becton

Facing History and Ourselves


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D210 Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

Creating The Comfort Zone: Strategies for Engaging Different Learners Through Creativity and the Arts

While it is not difficult to create arts activities that will excite both student and teacher, educators need to model the creative behavior that is expected from our students. The presenter, an arts integration specialist, will guide participants in developing a creative/artistic toolkit that will allow educators in any domain to identify opportunities for success for students who may otherwise be labeled behavior problems or a non-participants. In this interactive course, participants will use various entry points into creating art and engage with feedback protocols drawn from the arts. 

Intended Audience:  ECE-Middle School


Speakers
avatar for Rob Levit

Rob Levit

Arts Integration Specialist/Executive Director, Creating Communities
"Thanks so very much Rob! Your session during the conference was absolutely phenomenal. Talk about differentiated instruction – you have it mastered. Your passion, enthusiasm, instructional approach, emotional appeal and invitation to make the “Spirit of Caring” our first love... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
EC1125 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Developing a Sensitivity to the Design of Systems: Fostering Global Competencies in an Interconnected World

During this course, Project Zero researchers from the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative will partner with practitioners from schools in Oakland, CA, to facilitate a an exploration of why it’s critical for young people to think like makers/designers and how to develop the kinds of skills and capacities required to do this work. Participants will engage in hands-on activities designed in particular to examine systems thinking, including visual mapping exercises, user perspective-taking, and the noticing of dynamics of whole systems and object relationships within systems. Facilitators will also contextualize the work within contemporary cultural movements (e.g., a shift from a consumer to producer mentality) and discuss the role that curriculum and learning environments can play in supporting maker/design thinking. For the past two years, the AbD team has been exploring the intersection of the maker movement, design thinking and contemporary theories of learning. At the core of AbD’s work is the idea that cultivating a sensitivity to the made dimension of objects, ideas, and systems can help young people better position themselves to thrive in a global, complex and designed world.

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Edward Clapp

Edward Clapp

Senior Research Manager, Project Zero
Edward P. Clapp is a senior research manager and a member of the core research team working on the Agency by Design (AbD) initiative—an investigation of the promises, practices, and pedagogies of maker-centered learning—at Project Zero, an educational research center at the Harvard... Read More →
JE

Jenny Ernst

Park Day School, Park Day School
Teaching math and science with 6th graders at a progressive school has been a dream career. At this independent school in Oakland, my values around social justice have been cultivated through professional development to deeply understand my students and the world we live in. My latest... Read More →
JR

Jen Ryan

Researcher, Project Manager, Project Zero
avatar for Brooke Toczyloweski

Brooke Toczyloweski

Art and Technology Teacher, Oakland International High School


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D213 Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

Developing Creative Thinking Using Project Zero Ideas

How do we teach our students to think creatively? In this hands-on workshop, a language/literature teacher will engage participants in ways she has brought out creative thinking in the classroom using a variety of thinking routines. From her experience taking an online professional development course on Visible Thinking, attending workshops with Project Zero consultants, and collaborating with colleagues, she has included in her pedagogy ways for students to think metaphorically, draw meaningful connections and make their thinking visible, leading to deeper connections with content. Participants will experience several thinking routines and explore how to adapt them to their own settings. 

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Carole Geneix

Carole Geneix

Teacher, Washington International School
Carole Geneix is a French language and literature teacher at Washington International School. She is also an assistant examiner for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program. She has been teaching literature and French as a foreign language in private and public schools around... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D100 Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

Developing Global Competencies in the World Language Classroom Through Personal Relevance

There is a clear need to adapt current instructional approaches in order to better prepare the next generation of students for the changing world and for shifting social and economic demands. As educators, we need to help students become strategic and deliberate learners within a globalized context wherein the prefix “multi-” has become so important. How then do we engage our students in our content areas in such a way that also prepares them for intellectual and civic interaction with a much larger audience – the globe? As global language instructors in this era, the presenters of this course recognize that their teaching and learning goals must cultivate skills and knowledge that extend beyond linguistic competency. Their goals also must include cultural competency, critical thinking skills, application opportunities and relevant learning experiences. Participants will join in a discussion of the challenges of and opportunities for engaging students in learning for the present and the future. Using three pedagogical guides—thinking routines, the Teaching for Understanding framework, and Fink’s Taxonomy—participants will experience the process of creating projects applicable in their own contexts that reflect these objectives for the 21st century learner.

Intended Audience:  Secondary & Post-Secondary World Language Instructors


Speakers
JL

Julie Luebbers

Thomas More College
avatar for Amye Sukapdjo

Amye Sukapdjo

Assistant Professor of French, The University of North Georgia (US)
My research interests include biliteracy and bilingualism development, the use of technology in the foreign language classroom, and of course French culture and civilization, including France's culinary history.


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
EC1109 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Effective Professional Learning Communities: Supporting Learning in Staff Rooms and Classrooms

Of course, schools are meant to be places for learning. But too often teachers and students struggle to pool insights, share practices, and learn from one another. Based on research from group and team learning, this mini course will outline key features of learning communities and explore the traps that groups often fall into that inhibit learning. Participants will engage in discussion and activities that probe challenges about learning collaboratively and apply flexible tools to their work and/or classroom contexts. The ideas in this mini course support thinking about school-wide development and understanding.

Intended Audience: General


Speakers
avatar for Daniel Wilson

Daniel Wilson

Director, Project Zero
Dr. Daniel Wilson is the Director of Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE). He is a Principal Investigator at Project Zero, a Lecturer at HGSE, Faculty for the Doctorate for Educational Leadership program at HGSE, and the Educational Chair at Harvard’s... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
Dunavant Fitness Center Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

Engaging Adolescents in the Secondary Classroom

This course will provide an opportunity for participants to see first-hand how to make thinking visible in the secondary school classroom and  how to implement various thinking routines and protocols. The presenters will demonstrate how they accomplished integration of the Cultures of Thinking philosophy in their classroom by creating a collaborative learning environment that promotes student achievement, connects curriculum to the individual learner, increases student and teacher engagement, and provides opportunity for collaboration and documentation of student growth.

Intended Audience:  Secondary Teachers and Administrators


Speakers
AH

Amy Hohlbein

Spanish Teacher, Clarkton High School


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
EC1106 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Going Beyond Comprehension: Artful Thinking and the Common Core

Common Core standards in English/Language Arts call upon teachers to move children beyond the mere comprehension of text, towards a deeper engagement suggesting that students interact with text using critical, evidence-based thinking from multiple points of view. This interactive session will first engage participants in a Visible Thinking experience highlighting two thinking routines that can be used to enter text in ways that are compatible with what is being asked for in the Common Core.  A transcribed example of students using the same thinking routine as well as their written work will be examined and compared to language taken from the Common Core ELA Standards. The course, based on work done in a fourth grade classroom, will be presented by a university-level English/Language Arts elementary education faculty member and an experienced practitioner of Project Zero ideas.

Intended Audience:  Elementary Language Arts and Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Janet Navarro

Janet Navarro

Professor, Grand Valley State University
Equity Open-mindedness Kindness Joy My Family Summer at the Lake


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D101 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Making Thinking and Learning Visible: Creating an Environment Where Learning and Understanding Thrives

In this course, led by a fifth grade teacher and a media specialist, participants will experience first-hand how learning thrives in an environment that is immersed in a culture of thinking. Through the use of thinking routines, professional conversation and personal reflection, participants will walk away with a deep understanding and personal connection that they can apply immediately in their professional practice. The session will provide opportunities to engage in using thinking routines to examine their own mindset regarding thinking and learning; to view and evaluate student learning spaces and create their own design; to examine and evaluate student artifacts in collaborative setting; to view video clips, making note of evidence of the use of the eight cultural forces and their impact on student learning; create an integration plan for using thinking routines within their curriculum; and create a plan to foster a culture of thinking - an atmosphere where collaboration, self-discovery, creativity and global connections are the natural fabric of the learning in their own classroom/building.

Intended Audience:  School Administration, Elementary Teachers and Co-curricular Teachers


Speakers
avatar for Sharon Crain

Sharon Crain

Instructional Technologist, Clarkston Community Schools
I have been in education for 24 years and for the last 18 years have been a classroom teacher and media specialist. I am passionate about bringing thinking and learning alive for everyone I meet, whether it be children or adults. Igniting the desire in others to think and learn in... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D110 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Making Thinking Audible: Music and You as the Maker

In this course, participants will be asked to leave their assumptions at the door about their own ability to make music. Together we will create musical moments, short improvisational pieces and a group composition. We will experience thinking routines in in the context of listening carefully to song, exploring elements of sound/silence, and examining performances of each group's short composition. The presenter, an experienced musician and middle school music teacher, will invite participants to reconsider their thoughts about what they value and what convention directs them to disregard in listening to and creating music, with the hope widening the inner ear and listening beyond unreflective, inherited barriers of reaction.   

Intended Audience: General and musicians 


Speakers
avatar for Kit Young

Kit Young

Consultant & Writer
Kit Young returned in 2012 to Washington, D.C., from 20 years living in Thailand, Malaysia, Myanmar and China, where she pursued a career as a pianist, composer and organizer of concerts and festivals. She has lectured extensively about Burmese, Thai, traditional and contemporary... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D117 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Next Steps After a Project Zero Experience: Helping Learning Thrive Upon the Return to School

How might school leaders effectively support teachers in their school as those teachers return from a Project Zero institute or conference? The presenter, a Presbyterian Day School administrator, will share specific examples of systems of support used at PDS to help teachers as they begin to design and facilitate learning based on Project Zero methods and strategies. With the goal of creating a culture of thinking for all of the learners in their school, participants will experience routines and protocols useful in exploring these ideas further and begin to articulate a vision for their school and develop a plan for moving forward.

Intended Audience:  K-12 School leadership – administrators, curriculum leaders, teacher leaders, or anyone who supports professional development of teachers or is interested in facilitating change in a school.


Speakers
avatar for Susan Droke

Susan Droke

Assistant Head for Teaching and Learning, Presbyterian Day School
Susan Droke currently serves as Assistant Headmaster for Teaching and Learning at Presbyterian Day School (PDS), an independent boys’ school in Memphis, TN. During her teaching career in both public and independent schools, Susan has filled the roles of classroom teacher, as well... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
1404A Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Nurturing Global Competence Through the Use of Global Thinking Routines

The challenge is clear: The most pressing problems of our time—from climate change to mass migration, human rights to equitable economic development—demand global cooperation. They demand that we educate our youth to investigate topics of global significance, to collaborate across cultures, to communicate across difference and to take informed action. How can we transform our classrooms into spaces where students engage with the world beyond their immediate environment? For years, researchers at Project Zero have examined the role of Thinking Routines in the promotion of a culture of thinking and thinking dispositions. In this course, Project Zero researcher Veronica Boix Mansilla will explore a novel approach to Thinking Routines—Global Thinking Routines—specifically designed to advance students’ global competence. Through a combination of brief presentations and small group collaboration/discussion, participants will develop their understanding of what global competence is and why it matters today. They will examine the role of Thinking Routines in creating a globally-minded classroom culture and advancing student global competence. Through interactive exploration of various Global Thinking Routines, participants will develop the capacity to use these routines in their own classrooms.


Speakers
avatar for Mara Krechevsky

Mara Krechevsky

Senior Researcher at Project Zero - باحثة مختصة في مشروع زيرو, Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) - جامعة هارفرد / كلية الدراسات العليا
Mara is a senior researcher at Project Zero. For over 30 years, Mara has conducted educational research at PZ, including directing the Making Learning Visible (MLV) Project, an investigation into documenting and assessing individual and group learning in U.S. classrooms from preschool... Read More →
avatar for Veronica Boix Mansilla

Veronica Boix Mansilla

Project Zero, Harvard Graduate School of Education
Veronica Boix Mansilla is a principal investigator and Steering Committee member at Project Zero, HGSE, where she leads the IdGlobal Project and chairs the Future of Learning Institute. With a background in cognitive science, human development and education, she examines how to prepare... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
E105 Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

Out of Eden Learn: Where “Slow Learning” Meets Social Media

In the frenzied pace of school life, students (and teachers) rarely have time to consider big questions about themselves and humanity as a whole. How do our lives relate to place? How are we connected to other human beings? How do we as individuals fit into a bigger story of human history?  Where as a species are we collectively headed? In this course, the presenters, both Project Zero researchers on the Out of Eden Learn project, will draw from Project Zero’s collaboration with prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek, whose seven-year Out of Eden Walk involves retracing the migratory pathways of our ancient human ancestors and generating “slow journalism”. Participants will engage in a variety of activities that encourage students both to learn from the stories and perspectives of others as well as to reflect in new ways about themselves and the wider world. While we will introduce participants to our free, online learning community for middle and high school students, our activities will also be applicable to “off-line” classroom contexts. The course is open to all but may be of particular interest to history, geography and social studies educators.

Intended Audience: General 


Speakers
avatar for Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Liz Dawes Duraisingh

Principal Investigator, Project Zero
I've been playing a leading role with Out of Eden Learn, Project Zero's new online learning community to accompany journalist Paul Salopek's epic walk around the world. I'm a former history teacher and I'm particularly interested in making history and social studies more personally... Read More →
avatar for Carrie James

Carrie James

Principal Investigator, Harvard Project Zero
Carrie James is a Research Associate and Principal Investigator at Project Zero, and a Lecturer on Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research explores young people’s digital, moral, and civic lives.


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
E111 Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

Revolution and Evolution: How We Transformed a Building of Adult and Student Thinkers

Using a workshop model approach, the course presenters—both elementary school teachers—will give participants an overview of the six years of learning with Visible Thinking at various grade levels as well as the creative arts. From there we will showcase current units of study across content and grade level that have been guided and developed through the use of the planning frame. Presenters will walk our guests through the journey that we ourselves have taken in creating lessons as teachers in a Culture of Thinking.  We will share the revisions, reflections, learning and understanding that continue to take place each and every year.  Presenters will share samples of student thinking in connection to the units being discussed and further develop an understanding of how these visual representations of thinking are used to guide instruction.  Participants will be invited to reflect on what is being presented, become familiar with the LAST protocol,  and share their insights identifying where opportunities for thinking have been created and what possibilities have yet to be explored. Opting for practice over theory, conference attendees will be invited to work on the instructional design of personal units of study in the company of immediate colleagues.

Intended Audience:  elementary educators K-5



Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
EC1129 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Take a Leap Off the Edge: Merging the Principles of Harvard's Project Zero with Design Thinking

How does folding the edges of Design Thinking with the principles of Visible Thinking approaches create classrooms of understanding? How does this process equip today's learners to become the future problems solvers of tomorrow? In this workshop, we will share hands-on learning experiences that are living parts of our curriculum, not simply add-on lessons. Participants will have an opportunity to experience the four-step process of design thinking through the eyes and hands of a student. They will begin to create their own design thinking challenge(s) by collaborating with the team.

Intended Audience:  K-12


Speakers
avatar for Alice Parker

Alice Parker

Director of Tutoring & Enrichment Center and Learning Specialist, Presbyterian Day School
As a teacher, tutor and curriculum designer for over 27 years, Alice Maund Parker has expertise working with students ranging from those with learning disabilities to those who are academically gifted. She received her bachelors degree in elementary and special education from the... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Ann Taylor

Stephanie Ann Taylor

Teacher, Presbyterian Day School
I teach a classroom full of 2nd grade boys at Presbyterian Day School. In my classroom I enjoy finding ways to allow my students to learn for themselves, and creating an environment where students are led by what they want to know and understand. I am a third year teacher with a Bachelors... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
EC1107 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Telling the Stories of Teacher and Student Learning: PZ Ideas in Professional Development Settings

In this course, participants will focus first on their own questions about their professional practice. The group will then examine guiding questions developed by teachers who have exhibited their learning as well as their students’ in a public exhibition. The presenter, a middle school English teacher and the coordinator of the public exhibition, will engage the group in an exploration of how documentation “worked” (both in practice and in the learning that followed), what was added by the visible reflection threads, and where the work might go next. Participants will reflect together on connections between their initial questions and the possibilities occurring to them in working with the new material. They will leave  the course with a list of Project Zero resources, a cohort of practitioners in the group to use as a support network, and new questions to pursue. 

Intended Audience:  General; Professional Development


Speakers
avatar for Anne Charny

Anne Charny

Teacher, 7th & 8th Grade, Sidwell Friends School
Anne Charny teaches grades 7-8 English at Sidwell Friends Middle School. She began teaching in the Peace Corps in the Central African Republic in 1975; since then she has taught high school English in public and private schools in Washington and the Boston area, as well as at the... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
EC1132 Presbyterian Day School
  Saturday Courses

9:30am PST

The Influence of Thinking, Creativity and Culture on Professional Development and Student Learning

When teachers learn together and make their learning public with one another, learning thrives. Over several years, a Massachusetts public school district combined forces with Project Zero researchers to help faculty question pedagogy and the role of creative and innovative teaching and learning. Learn about how a PK-12 professional development experience called Creative Classroom transformed learning for teachers and students. The presenters of this course, an arts administrator/program developer and a fifth grade teacher, will share their perspectives on how this professional development experience influenced their thinking and the learning of others. What does it mean to have a creative classroom? How does having a creative classroom connect with and influence curriculum, classroom structure, expectations, and culture? How do students benefit from being part of a creative classroom? Participants will discuss approaches and experience strategies used in a creative classroom. They will also discuss how these tools and ideas can be adapted for use in their own settings.

Intended Audience:  Teachers PK-12 (all disciplines), Administrators


Speakers
avatar for Natalie Boes Belli

Natalie Boes Belli

Grade 5 language arts and social studies teacher, Village School
Grade 5 humanities teacher -- I am passionate about learning and improving student understanding. I make thinking visible and organic by layering and extending thinking routines in a nontraditional classroom setting. My classroom has been described as a networking, researching... Read More →
avatar for Beth Delforge

Beth Delforge

Pk-12 Visual & Performing Arts Program Coordinator, Andover Public Schools
My passions include understanding and enjoying the creative process as a visual artist, an educator, and an observer of others (students, teachers, administrators) involved in the creative process. I am passionate about building a community of inquiry where the meaning of learning... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
EC1108 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

The Memory Project : An Intergenerational, Arts-Based Collaboration in a Reggio Emilia-Inspired School

Filmed memories shared by both senior citizens and children are a powerful provocation for collaboration between teachers, students and members of the local community. The presenters, an elementary school art teacher and a fifth grade teacher, used the eight Studio Habits of Mind, developed at Project Zero, as a directional tool for students to communicate their interpretation of memories through creative works of art. The students fully engaged in documenting memories of both senior citizens and peers, culminating in their participation in an art exhibition held at a senior center. Participants in this course will have the opportunity to experience the type of creative collaboration that the students experienced, as well as view demonstrations of learning.

Intended Audience:  Art teachers, elementary and or middle school teachers, principals and or administrators interested in promoting more collaborative work between their teachers


Speakers
avatar for Doris Benter

Doris Benter

Department Head, Visual Arts, Portledge School
SM

Sara McInerney

5th Grade Teacher, Portledge School


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D108 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

UNCOMMON IT Integration for the COMMON CORE

The presenters—educators at a public elementary school in Michigan—will explore with participants the way their students are learning how to participate respectfully in a global technological community and at the same time capture their academic thinking in a visible way. Participants will see demonstrations of how technology can make representations of thinking and learning visible and how it can increase learning. Having aligned their curriculum and assessments to the Common Core and embedded thinking routines into all classrooms, the presenters will show how they document and assess student and teacher learning in order to further their own learning. They also will share how teachers work collaboratively; how they collaborate with students to use data to drive instruction; how they work with the community to extend the culture of learning; and how they collaborate with families through digital home/school connection. Ultimately, these examples will show how the school is helping to make all of its stakeholders’ thinking and learning visible through multiple, effective and collaborative endeavors, in a variety of contexts.

Intended Audience:  Elementary K-6, Central Office, Elementary Principals



Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
EC1102 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Uncommon Movements on the Stairs Project: Making The Ordinary Extraordinary in a Reggio-Inspired School

This interactive course will focus on the Stair Project, based on the journey of a Reggio Emilia-inspired pre-kindergarten class. As teachers observed their students’ fascination with the stairs, they became interested in exploring the children’s relationship with the stairs. Participants will learn about the project from start to finish and engage in a process similar to what the children followed—observing, interacting, listening and documenting one another’s thinking—as a way to gain a better understanding of the children’s thinking.

Intended Audience:  Early Childhood


Speakers
KH

Katie Henry

Pre-K Teacher, Portledge School


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D216 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Using Thinking Routines to Develop Reflective Dispositions in Young Mathematicians

What role does reflection have on mathematical understanding, and how can teachers facilitate the development of reflective dispositions in young mathematicians? Participants in this course—led by two teachers in urban Washington, D.C., schools—will engage in discourse about the role of reflection in mathematical understanding by generating a list of thinking moves that develop a reflective disposition. We will aim to connect these move to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematical Practice as ways to engage students of all grade levels in mathematically complex tasks. Throughout the session, participants will engage in a variety of thinking routines that promote and deepen reflective dispositions. Participants will reflect on authentic student work by using a thinking routine, engage in a mathematical inquiry using an individual and group problem solving process, and then reflect upon shifts in their own thinking and understanding at the end of the course.

Intended Audience:  Math elementary and middle school teachers


Speakers
avatar for Elise Heil

Elise Heil

Middle School Math Teacher, Sacred Heart School
I am a middle school math teacher and math coach in Washington DC. I have attended the Project Zero Classroom twice at Harvard University over the past few years and have immersed myself in their work. As a part of DC-PZ, a group of DC based educators interested in Project Zero ideas... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D211 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Using Visible Thinking and Global Thinking Routines as a Vehicle to Nurture Empathy in Preschoolers
How can our early childhood classrooms nurture global thinkers? How do recognizing the brain’s role in regulating emotions and understanding the way emotions affect other people help us to shape empathetic preschoolers in the classroom? This course, led by an early childhood education researcher and a preschool teacher, will offer opportunities to analyze how thinking routines and global thinking routines engage preschoolers in the nurturing of global habits of mind. Special emphasis will be given to how preschoolers become aware of their own emotions, as well as those of others in the classroom. When children are able to recognize their own feelings and manage those feelings, they are more likely to identify emotions in others and help them come back to their regular state of mind. 

Participants will experience global thinking routines that have been designed to nurture global competence in young children. 

Intended Audience:  This course is intended for: early childhood teachers, elementary teachers, administrators, and faculty.

 

Speakers
avatar for Daniela Fenu-Foerch

Daniela Fenu-Foerch

Instructor, Florida International University


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
EC1101 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Visible Thinking in the Second Language Acquisition Process: A Natural Learning Environment for Communication

In this course participants will experience how to build a Culture of Thinking in the foreign language classroom, practicing how to develop learning opportunities that assist students in cultivating dispositions necessary in the language acquisition process. The presenters, both secondary-level Spanish teachers, will offer examples of  teaching and learning experiences using thinking routines, including reflections from students about how these routines helped them to contextualize their language use as well as lowered their affective filters towards their practice. The intention of this interactive course will be to show how thinking routines can promote a positive attitude for foreign language learners who too often find themselves trapped in frustrating "right or wrong" mind frames.

Intended Audience:  General, Foreign Language teachers


Speakers
avatar for Carmen Samanes

Carmen Samanes

MYP Coordinator/Teacher, Atlanta International School
Carmen Samanes is a MYP curriculum coordinator and Spanish/Humanities Teachers at Atlanta International School with eighteen years of International education experience. She is interested in language acquisition research. In order to help students learn better and become more thoughtful... Read More →
avatar for Elena Zapico

Elena Zapico

Spanish Teacher, Atlanta International School
I am a Spanish teacher dedicated to create a Culture of Thinking that transforms the way Foreign Languages are learned and used in and beyond the classroom setting. Besides teaching, I am completing my PhD in Literature through the University of Salamanca, Spain. When I don´t... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D205 Presbyterian Day School

9:30am PST

Working To The Core of Math, One Layer at a Time

Learning thrives when students feel comfortable to take risks and learn from their mistakes. Sometimes there are no right or wrong answers, and getting students to simply think about numbers and their role evolves into creative problem solving. There can be more than one way to solve a problem! After years of using thinking routines in their math curriculum, the presenters, two upper elementary math teachers, will share ways they have added many layers to the learning inside and outside the walls of the classroom. This journey has resulted in students taking ownership for their learning and thinking like problem solvers.

Intended Audience:  Math Teachers (K-12)


Speakers
SL

Susan Love

Presbyterian Day School
WM

Windy May

Teacher, Presbyterian Day School
Since graduating from the University of Mississippi with a Masters degree in math education, Windy May has experienced a wide range of classrooms, teaching high school honors geometry, as well as middle school and elementary math. Throughout the years, Windy’s professional development... Read More →


Saturday February 15, 2014 9:30am - 11:30am PST
D214 Presbyterian Day School

11:45am PST

Closing Remarks: From Idea to Action

What ideas from the conference have resonated with you? How do you keep an idea alive in your own practice? Come to this closing plenary session and hear from fellow participants about ways to sustain Project Zero ideas long after the conference has ended.


Saturday February 15, 2014 11:45am - 12:15pm PST
Fellowship Hall Second Presbyterian Church